Psychosocial stress and coping in smokers who relapse or quit.

David Abrams, P. M. Monti, R. P. Pinto, J. P. Elder, R. A. Brown, S. I. Jacobus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Relapse remains a major problem in successful smoking cessation. This study evaluated selected responses and coping skills in male and female quitters and relapsers in four situational contexts: general social competence, smoking-specific "high-risk-for-relapse" situations, social anxiety, and relaxation. Results showed that quitters coped better than relapsers with intrapersonal (e.g., negative mood) smoking-specific situations. Quitters had lower heart rates than relapsers during relaxation and intrapersonal situations and had lower anxiety scores at the end of the procedures. Women showed more stress and less confidence in their ability to cope than did men. Groups did not differ in responses to the general social competence and social anxiety procedures. Results are discussed in the context of the importance of considering individual differences in responses and in coping skills for treatment and relapse prevention for smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-303
Number of pages15
JournalHealth psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

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Anxiety
Psychological Adaptation
Recurrence
Smoking
Aptitude
Smoking Cessation
Secondary Prevention
Individuality
Heart Rate
Social Skills
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Psychosocial stress and coping in smokers who relapse or quit. / Abrams, David; Monti, P. M.; Pinto, R. P.; Elder, J. P.; Brown, R. A.; Jacobus, S. I.

In: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1987, p. 289-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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