Psychosocial issues in adults with transfusion-related HIV infection and their families

Les Gallo-Silver, Victoria Raveis, Rosemary T. Moynihan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Clinical data on all non-hemophiliac adult cases of transfusion-induced HIV infection (TI-HIV) referred for treatment to the Infectious Disease Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1987 to 1989 (N = 20) provided an opportunity to investigate the social and psychological impact of transfusion-induced HIV-infection. The specific psychosocial issues presented by this population which relate to the circumstances of their infection (i.e., blood transfusions) include: coping with personal feelings of victimization, sadness, anger, and isolation; decision-making concerning medical treatment; and re-building trust in relationships with medical care professionals. Counseling interventions with this population are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-74
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Work in Health Care
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1993

Fingerprint

HIV Infections
Crime Victims
Anger
memorial
physician's care
anger
Blood Transfusion
victimization
medical care
Population
contagious disease
Communicable Diseases
Counseling
counseling
social isolation
Emotions
coping
cancer
Psychology
decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Health Policy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Psychosocial issues in adults with transfusion-related HIV infection and their families. / Gallo-Silver, Les; Raveis, Victoria; Moynihan, Rosemary T.

In: Social Work in Health Care, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.06.1993, p. 63-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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