Psychosocial and behavioral correlates of refusing unwanted sex among African-American adolescent females

Catlainn Sionéan, Ralph DiClemente, Gina M. Wingood, Richard Crosby, Brenda K. Cobb, Kathy Harrington, Susan L. Davies, Edward W. Hook, M. Kim Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To identify psychosocial and behavioral correlates of refusing unwanted sex among African-American female adolescents. We hypothesized that greater power in relationships, less concern about negative emotional consequences, supportive family and peers, positive self-perceptions, greater perceived risk, and fewer sexual risk behaviors would be associated with increased odds of refusing unwanted sex. Methods: Data regarding demographics, sexual behaviors, communication with parents, and psychosocial factors relevant to romantic and sexual partnerships were collected both via self-administered questionnaire and structured interview from a clinic- and school-based sample of 522 African-American adolescent females ages 14-18 years in Birmingham, Alabama. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Of those who had experienced pressure for unwanted sex (n = 366), 69% consistently refused to engage in unwanted sex. Adolescents with high safer sex self-efficacy and low perceived partner-related barriers (i.e., concerns about partners' negative emotional reactions) to condom negotiation were over 2.5 times more likely to consistently refuse unwanted sex than were those reporting low safer sex self-efficacy and high partner-related barriers. Adolescents who spoke more frequently with their parents about sexual issues were nearly twice as likely to consistently refuse unwanted sex than were those who spoke less frequently with their parents. Conclusions: Sexual-risk reduction efforts directed toward adolescent females should seek to build self-efficacy to negotiate safer sex and provide training in social competency skills that may help to reduce or eliminate partner barriers to condom use. Further, sexual risk-reduction programs may be more effective if they include parents as advocates of safer sexual behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-63
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2002

Fingerprint

African Americans
Safe Sex
Self Efficacy
Parents
Sexual Behavior
Condoms
Risk Reduction Behavior
Negotiating
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Communication
Demography
Interviews
Psychology
Pressure

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African-American
  • Female
  • Refusal of sex
  • Sexual behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Psychosocial and behavioral correlates of refusing unwanted sex among African-American adolescent females. / Sionéan, Catlainn; DiClemente, Ralph; Wingood, Gina M.; Crosby, Richard; Cobb, Brenda K.; Harrington, Kathy; Davies, Susan L.; Hook, Edward W.; Oh, M. Kim.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 30, No. 1, 15.01.2002, p. 55-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sionéan, C, DiClemente, R, Wingood, GM, Crosby, R, Cobb, BK, Harrington, K, Davies, SL, Hook, EW & Oh, MK 2002, 'Psychosocial and behavioral correlates of refusing unwanted sex among African-American adolescent females', Journal of Adolescent Health, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 55-63. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1054-139X(01)00318-4
Sionéan, Catlainn ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Wingood, Gina M. ; Crosby, Richard ; Cobb, Brenda K. ; Harrington, Kathy ; Davies, Susan L. ; Hook, Edward W. ; Oh, M. Kim. / Psychosocial and behavioral correlates of refusing unwanted sex among African-American adolescent females. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2002 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 55-63.
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