Protein surface recognition and proteomimetics: Mimics of protein surface structure and function

Steven Fletcher, Andrew Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Due to their key roles in a number of biological processes, protein-protein interactions are attractive and important targets, typically involving areas greater than 6 nm2. The disruption of such interactions remains a challenging feat but, in recent years, there has been considerable progress in the design of proteomimetics: molecules that mimic the structure and function of extended regions of protein surfaces. In particular, porphyrins, calixarenes, α-helical mimetics and small molecules have successfully modulated significant protein-protein interactions, including those involved in cancer and HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)632-638
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Chemical Biology
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Fingerprint

Surface structure
Membrane Proteins
Proteins
Calixarenes
Biological Phenomena
Molecules
Porphyrins
HIV
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Protein surface recognition and proteomimetics : Mimics of protein surface structure and function. / Fletcher, Steven; Hamilton, Andrew.

In: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Vol. 9, No. 6, 12.2005, p. 632-638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e4b652f049de43cf9833b9e3502b6bd8,
title = "Protein surface recognition and proteomimetics: Mimics of protein surface structure and function",
abstract = "Due to their key roles in a number of biological processes, protein-protein interactions are attractive and important targets, typically involving areas greater than 6 nm2. The disruption of such interactions remains a challenging feat but, in recent years, there has been considerable progress in the design of proteomimetics: molecules that mimic the structure and function of extended regions of protein surfaces. In particular, porphyrins, calixarenes, α-helical mimetics and small molecules have successfully modulated significant protein-protein interactions, including those involved in cancer and HIV.",
author = "Steven Fletcher and Andrew Hamilton",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.cbpa.2005.10.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "632--638",
journal = "Current Opinion in Chemical Biology",
issn = "1367-5931",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Protein surface recognition and proteomimetics

T2 - Mimics of protein surface structure and function

AU - Fletcher, Steven

AU - Hamilton, Andrew

PY - 2005/12

Y1 - 2005/12

N2 - Due to their key roles in a number of biological processes, protein-protein interactions are attractive and important targets, typically involving areas greater than 6 nm2. The disruption of such interactions remains a challenging feat but, in recent years, there has been considerable progress in the design of proteomimetics: molecules that mimic the structure and function of extended regions of protein surfaces. In particular, porphyrins, calixarenes, α-helical mimetics and small molecules have successfully modulated significant protein-protein interactions, including those involved in cancer and HIV.

AB - Due to their key roles in a number of biological processes, protein-protein interactions are attractive and important targets, typically involving areas greater than 6 nm2. The disruption of such interactions remains a challenging feat but, in recent years, there has been considerable progress in the design of proteomimetics: molecules that mimic the structure and function of extended regions of protein surfaces. In particular, porphyrins, calixarenes, α-helical mimetics and small molecules have successfully modulated significant protein-protein interactions, including those involved in cancer and HIV.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27744564465&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=27744564465&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cbpa.2005.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.cbpa.2005.10.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 16242379

AN - SCOPUS:27744564465

VL - 9

SP - 632

EP - 638

JO - Current Opinion in Chemical Biology

JF - Current Opinion in Chemical Biology

SN - 1367-5931

IS - 6

ER -