Promoting routine stair use

Evaluating the impact of a stair prompt across buildings

Karen K. Lee, Ashley S. Perry, Sarah A. Wolf, Reena Agarwal, Randi Rosenblum, Sean Fischer, Victoria E. Grimshaw, Richard Wener, Lynn D. Silver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although studies have demonstrated that stair prompts are associated with increased physical activity, many were conducted in low-rise buildings over a period of weeks and did not differentiate between stair climbing and descent. Purpose: This study evaluated the impact of a prompt across different building types, and on stair climbing versus descent over several months. Methods: In 20082009, stair and elevator trips were observed and analyzed at three buildings in New York City before and after the posting of a prompt stating "Burn Calories, Not Electricity" (total observations=18,462). Sites included a three-story health clinic (observations=4987); an eight-story academic building (observations=5151); and a ten-story affordable housing site (observations=8324). Stair and elevator trips up and down were recorded separately at the health clinic to isolate the impact on climbing and descent. Follow-up was conducted at the health clinic and affordable housing site to assess long-term impact. Results: Increased stair use was seen at all sites immediately after posting of the prompt (range=9.2%34.7% relative increase, p<0.001). Relative increases in stair climbing (20.2% increase, p<0.001) and descent (4.4% increase, p<0.05) were seen at the health clinic. At both sites with long-term follow-up, relative increases were maintained at 9 months after posting compared to baseline: 42.7% (p<0.001) increase in stair use at the affordable housing site and 20.3% (p<0.001) increase in stair climbing at the health clinic. Conclusions: Findings suggest that the prompt was effective in increasing physical activity in diverse settings, and increases were maintained at 9 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-141
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

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Elevators and Escalators
Health
Electricity
Stair Climbing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Lee, K. K., Perry, A. S., Wolf, S. A., Agarwal, R., Rosenblum, R., Fischer, S., ... Silver, L. D. (2012). Promoting routine stair use: Evaluating the impact of a stair prompt across buildings. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 42(2), 136-141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2011.10.005

Promoting routine stair use : Evaluating the impact of a stair prompt across buildings. / Lee, Karen K.; Perry, Ashley S.; Wolf, Sarah A.; Agarwal, Reena; Rosenblum, Randi; Fischer, Sean; Grimshaw, Victoria E.; Wener, Richard; Silver, Lynn D.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 2, 02.2012, p. 136-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, KK, Perry, AS, Wolf, SA, Agarwal, R, Rosenblum, R, Fischer, S, Grimshaw, VE, Wener, R & Silver, LD 2012, 'Promoting routine stair use: Evaluating the impact of a stair prompt across buildings', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 136-141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2011.10.005
Lee, Karen K. ; Perry, Ashley S. ; Wolf, Sarah A. ; Agarwal, Reena ; Rosenblum, Randi ; Fischer, Sean ; Grimshaw, Victoria E. ; Wener, Richard ; Silver, Lynn D. / Promoting routine stair use : Evaluating the impact of a stair prompt across buildings. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 136-141.
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