Project VIVA: A multilevel community-based intervention to increase influenza vaccination rates among hard-to-reach populations in New York City

Micaela H. Coady, Sandro Galea, Shannon Blaney, Danielle C. Ompad, Sarah Sisco, David Vlahov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We sought to determine whether the work of a community-based participatory research partnership increased interest in influenza vaccination among hard-to-reach individuals in urban settings. Methods. A partnership of researchers and community members carried out interventions for increasing acceptance of influenza vaccination in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods, focusing on hard-to-reach populations (e.g., substance abusers, immigrants, elderly, sex workers, and homeless persons) in East Harlem and the Bronx in New York City. Activities targeted the individual, community organization, and neighborhood levels and included dissemination of information, presentations at meetings, and provision of street-based and door-to-door vaccination during 2 influenza vaccine seasons. Participants were recruited via multiple modalities. Multivariable analyses were performed to compare interest in receiving vaccination pre- and postintervention. Results. There was increased interest in receiving the influenza vaccine postintervention (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1314-1321
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume98
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

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Human Influenza
Vaccination
Influenza Vaccines
Population
Community-Based Participatory Research
Homeless Persons
Sex Workers
Information Dissemination
Vulnerable Populations
Research Personnel
Organizations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Project VIVA : A multilevel community-based intervention to increase influenza vaccination rates among hard-to-reach populations in New York City. / Coady, Micaela H.; Galea, Sandro; Blaney, Shannon; Ompad, Danielle C.; Sisco, Sarah; Vlahov, David.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 98, No. 7, 01.07.2008, p. 1314-1321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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