Project MAINSTREAM's first fellowship cohort: Pilot test of a national dissemination model to enhance substance abuse curriculum at health professions schools

Richard L. Brown, Marianne T. Marcus, S. Lala, Shulamith Lala Ashenberg Straussner, Antonette V. Graham, Theresa Madden, Eugene Schoener, Rebecca Henry

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objective: Generalist health professional training on substance abuse prevention is patchy. This study assessed the effects of Project MAINSTREAM, a national interdisciplinary faculty development fellowship program, whose principal objective was to enhance curriculum on basic substance abuse services at health professions training institutions. Five interdisciplinary teams of three health professions' faculty were selected as fellows. This study assessed changes in curriculum, training, fellows' knowledge, and fellows' academic productivity in substance abuse. Design: Pre- and post-program surveys and interviews were administered. Setting: Fellows were located in five cities in the USA. Method: The two-year, part-time training program featured training meetings, on-site and distance mentoring, and internet-based instructional materials. Principal learning activities consisted of developing independent projects in curriculum enhancement and prevention services delivery. Results: Fellows implemented 45 distinct curricula, providing 19,000 hours of new instruction to over 5000 trainees. Over 80 per cent of the training occurred as required curricular experiences. Fellows' academic accomplishments included five peer-reviewed publications, seven additional submitted papers, 78 presentations, and 23 awards or appointments. Fellows' knowledge increased significantly. Conclusions: Project MAINSTREAM shows promise as a national model for enhancing health professional training on substance abuse. copyright

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)252-266
    Number of pages15
    JournalHealth Education Journal
    Volume65
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

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    Health Occupations
    Curriculum
    Substance-Related Disorders
    Health
    Internet
    Publications
    Appointments and Schedules
    Learning
    Interviews
    Efficiency
    Education

    Keywords

    • Faculty
    • Interdisciplinary communication
    • Medical staff development program evaluation
    • Substance-related disorders

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Project MAINSTREAM's first fellowship cohort : Pilot test of a national dissemination model to enhance substance abuse curriculum at health professions schools. / Brown, Richard L.; Marcus, Marianne T.; Lala, S.; Straussner, Shulamith Lala Ashenberg; Graham, Antonette V.; Madden, Theresa; Schoener, Eugene; Henry, Rebecca.

    In: Health Education Journal, Vol. 65, No. 3, 01.09.2006, p. 252-266.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Brown, Richard L. ; Marcus, Marianne T. ; Lala, S. ; Straussner, Shulamith Lala Ashenberg ; Graham, Antonette V. ; Madden, Theresa ; Schoener, Eugene ; Henry, Rebecca. / Project MAINSTREAM's first fellowship cohort : Pilot test of a national dissemination model to enhance substance abuse curriculum at health professions schools. In: Health Education Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 65, No. 3. pp. 252-266.
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