Programmable assembly at the molecular scale

Self-assembly of DNA lattices (invited paper)

J. H. Reif, T. H. LaBean, N. C. Seeman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

DNA self-assembly is a methodology for the construction of molecular scale structures. In this method, artificially synthesized single stranded DNA self-assemble into DNA crossover molecules (tiles). These DNA tiles have sticky ends that preferentially match the sticky ends of certain other DNA tiles, facilitating the further assembly into tiling lattices. DNA self-assembly can, using only a small number of component tiles, provide arbitrarily complex assemblies. The self-assembly of large 2D lattices consisting of up to thousands of tiles have been recently demonstrated, and 3D DNA lattices may soon be feasible to construct. We describe various novel DNA tiles with properties that facilitate self-assembly and their visualization by imaging devices such as atomic three microscope. We discuss key theoretical and practical challenges of DNA self-assembly, as well as numerous potential applications. We briefly discuss the ongoing development of attachment chemistry from DNA lattices to various types of mole cules, and consider application of DNA lattices (assuming the development of such appropriate attachment chemistry from DNA lattices to these objects) as a substrate for: (a) molecular robotics; for manipulation of molecules using molecular motor devices, (b) layout of molecular electronic circuit components, (c) surface chemistry, for example ultra compact annealing arrays, We also discuss bounds on the speed and error rates of the various types of self-assembly reactions, as well as methods that may minimize errors in self-assembly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation
Pages966-971
Number of pages6
Volume1
StatePublished - 2001
Event2001IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: May 21 2001May 26 2001

Other

Other2001IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period5/21/015/26/01

Fingerprint

Self assembly
DNA
Tile
Molecular electronics
Molecules
Surface chemistry
Robotics
Microscopes
Visualization
Annealing
Imaging techniques
Networks (circuits)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Reif, J. H., LaBean, T. H., & Seeman, N. C. (2001). Programmable assembly at the molecular scale: Self-assembly of DNA lattices (invited paper). In Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (Vol. 1, pp. 966-971)

Programmable assembly at the molecular scale : Self-assembly of DNA lattices (invited paper). / Reif, J. H.; LaBean, T. H.; Seeman, N. C.

Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Vol. 1 2001. p. 966-971.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Reif, JH, LaBean, TH & Seeman, NC 2001, Programmable assembly at the molecular scale: Self-assembly of DNA lattices (invited paper). in Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. vol. 1, pp. 966-971, 2001IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 5/21/01.
Reif JH, LaBean TH, Seeman NC. Programmable assembly at the molecular scale: Self-assembly of DNA lattices (invited paper). In Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Vol. 1. 2001. p. 966-971
Reif, J. H. ; LaBean, T. H. ; Seeman, N. C. / Programmable assembly at the molecular scale : Self-assembly of DNA lattices (invited paper). Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Vol. 1 2001. pp. 966-971
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