Primary cilia: Cellular sensors for the skeleton

Charles T. Anderson, Alesha Castillo, Samantha A. Brugmann, Jill A. Helms, Christopher R. Jacobs, Tim Stearns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile cilium that is present in almost every mammalian cell type. Primary cilia are thought to function as chemosensors, mechanosensors, or both, depending on cell type, and have been linked to several developmental signaling pathways. Primary cilium malfunction has been implicated in several human diseases, the symptoms of which include vision and hearing loss, polydactyly, and polycystic kidneys. Recently, primary cilia have also been implicated in the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. In this review, we discuss the structure and formation of the primary cilium and some of the mechanical and chemical signals to which it could be sensitive, with a focus on skeletal biology. We also raise several unanswered questions regarding the role of primary cilia as mechanosensors and chemosensors and identify potential research avenues to address these questions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1074-1078
Number of pages5
JournalAnatomical Record
Volume291
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Cilia
hearing
homeostasis
cilia
Skeleton
skeleton
sensor
Deaf-Blind Disorders
Polydactyly
Polycystic Kidney Diseases
loss
chemical
human disease
human diseases
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Homeostasis
kidneys
cells
Biological Sciences
Research

Keywords

  • Kidneys, cilia
  • Primary cilium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Histology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biotechnology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Anderson, C. T., Castillo, A., Brugmann, S. A., Helms, J. A., Jacobs, C. R., & Stearns, T. (2008). Primary cilia: Cellular sensors for the skeleton. Anatomical Record, 291(9), 1074-1078. https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.20754

Primary cilia : Cellular sensors for the skeleton. / Anderson, Charles T.; Castillo, Alesha; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Helms, Jill A.; Jacobs, Christopher R.; Stearns, Tim.

In: Anatomical Record, Vol. 291, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 1074-1078.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, CT, Castillo, A, Brugmann, SA, Helms, JA, Jacobs, CR & Stearns, T 2008, 'Primary cilia: Cellular sensors for the skeleton', Anatomical Record, vol. 291, no. 9, pp. 1074-1078. https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.20754
Anderson CT, Castillo A, Brugmann SA, Helms JA, Jacobs CR, Stearns T. Primary cilia: Cellular sensors for the skeleton. Anatomical Record. 2008 Sep;291(9):1074-1078. https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.20754
Anderson, Charles T. ; Castillo, Alesha ; Brugmann, Samantha A. ; Helms, Jill A. ; Jacobs, Christopher R. ; Stearns, Tim. / Primary cilia : Cellular sensors for the skeleton. In: Anatomical Record. 2008 ; Vol. 291, No. 9. pp. 1074-1078.
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