Prevention with gay and bisexual men living with HIV: Rationale and methods of the Seropositive Urban Men's Intervention Trial (SUMIT)

Richard J. Wolitski, Jeffrey T. Parsons, Cynthia A. Gómez, David W. Purcell, Colleen C. Hoff, Perry N. Halkitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To provide a public health rationale for prevention with HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men and to describe the methods of the Seropositive Urban Men's Intervention Trial (SUMIT). Design: A randomized intervention trial. Methods: Self-identified HIV-positive gay and bisexual men were recruited from community-based venues in New York City and San Francisco. Eligible participants completed an A-CASI baseline assessment, were asked to provide samples for sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing, and were randomly assigned to either a single-session intervention or a six-session enhanced intervention designed to reduce HIV transmission risk and promote serostatus disclosure. Participants who attended the first intervention session were assessed 3 and 6 months post-intervention. STI testing was offered at the 6-month assessment. Results: A total of 1168 self-identified HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men completed the baseline assessment, and 1110 of these (95%) opted for STI testing. A total of 811 attended the first intervention session, of which 85% were assessed at 3 months and 90% were assessed at 6 months. Of those assessed at 6 months, 92% (670/729) provided a blood or urine sample for STI testing. Conclusion: SUMIT demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of prevention research with HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men. The study provides new information about the sexual behavior, serostatus disclosure practices, and the efficacy of an intervention to reduce HIV transmission risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS, Supplement
Volume19
Issue number1
StatePublished - Apr 2005

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HIV
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Disclosure
San Francisco
Sexual Minorities
Sexual Behavior
Public Health
Urine
Research

Keywords

  • Gay and bisexual men
  • HIV seropositivity
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Serostatus disclosure
  • Sex behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Wolitski, R. J., Parsons, J. T., Gómez, C. A., Purcell, D. W., Hoff, C. C., & Halkitis, P. N. (2005). Prevention with gay and bisexual men living with HIV: Rationale and methods of the Seropositive Urban Men's Intervention Trial (SUMIT). AIDS, Supplement, 19(1).

Prevention with gay and bisexual men living with HIV : Rationale and methods of the Seropositive Urban Men's Intervention Trial (SUMIT). / Wolitski, Richard J.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Gómez, Cynthia A.; Purcell, David W.; Hoff, Colleen C.; Halkitis, Perry N.

In: AIDS, Supplement, Vol. 19, No. 1, 04.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolitski, RJ, Parsons, JT, Gómez, CA, Purcell, DW, Hoff, CC & Halkitis, PN 2005, 'Prevention with gay and bisexual men living with HIV: Rationale and methods of the Seropositive Urban Men's Intervention Trial (SUMIT)', AIDS, Supplement, vol. 19, no. 1.
Wolitski, Richard J. ; Parsons, Jeffrey T. ; Gómez, Cynthia A. ; Purcell, David W. ; Hoff, Colleen C. ; Halkitis, Perry N. / Prevention with gay and bisexual men living with HIV : Rationale and methods of the Seropositive Urban Men's Intervention Trial (SUMIT). In: AIDS, Supplement. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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