Prevalence and Correlates of Smoking among Low-Income Adults Residing in New York City Public Housing Developments—2015

A. Feinberg, P. M. Lopez, K. Wyka, N. Islam, L. Seidl, E. Drackett, A. Mata, J. Pinzon, M. R. Baker, J. Lopez, C. Trinh-Shevrin, D. Shelley, Z. Bailey, K. A. Maybank, Lorna Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To guide targeted cessation and prevention programming, this study assessed smoking prevalence and described sociodemographic, health, and healthcare use characteristics of adult smokers in public housing. Self-reported data were analyzed from a random sample of 1664 residents aged 35 and older in ten New York City public housing developments in East/Central Harlem. Smoking prevalence was 20.8%. Weighted log-binomial models identified to be having Medicaid, not having a personal doctor, and using health clinics for routine care were positively associated with smoking. Smokers without a personal doctor were less likely to receive provider quit advice. While most smokers in these public housing developments had health insurance, a personal doctor, and received provider cessation advice in the last year (72.4%), persistently high smoking rates suggest that such cessation advice may be insufficient. Efforts to eliminate differences in tobacco use should consider place-based smoking cessation interventions that extend cessation support beyond clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Urban Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 27 2017

Fingerprint

Public Housing
public housing
smoking
low income
Smoking
housing development
Medicaid
Health
Tobacco Use
Statistical Models
Smoking Cessation
Health Insurance
health
health insurance
random sample
nicotine
Delivery of Health Care
programming
resident

Keywords

  • Chronic diseases
  • New York City
  • Primary healthcare
  • Public housing developments
  • Smoking
  • Urban health services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Prevalence and Correlates of Smoking among Low-Income Adults Residing in New York City Public Housing Developments—2015. / Feinberg, A.; Lopez, P. M.; Wyka, K.; Islam, N.; Seidl, L.; Drackett, E.; Mata, A.; Pinzon, J.; Baker, M. R.; Lopez, J.; Trinh-Shevrin, C.; Shelley, D.; Bailey, Z.; Maybank, K. A.; Thorpe, Lorna.

In: Journal of Urban Health, 27.06.2017, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feinberg, A, Lopez, PM, Wyka, K, Islam, N, Seidl, L, Drackett, E, Mata, A, Pinzon, J, Baker, MR, Lopez, J, Trinh-Shevrin, C, Shelley, D, Bailey, Z, Maybank, KA & Thorpe, L 2017, 'Prevalence and Correlates of Smoking among Low-Income Adults Residing in New York City Public Housing Developments—2015', Journal of Urban Health, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-017-0180-z
Feinberg, A. ; Lopez, P. M. ; Wyka, K. ; Islam, N. ; Seidl, L. ; Drackett, E. ; Mata, A. ; Pinzon, J. ; Baker, M. R. ; Lopez, J. ; Trinh-Shevrin, C. ; Shelley, D. ; Bailey, Z. ; Maybank, K. A. ; Thorpe, Lorna. / Prevalence and Correlates of Smoking among Low-Income Adults Residing in New York City Public Housing Developments—2015. In: Journal of Urban Health. 2017 ; pp. 1-9.
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