Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity

Andrew P. Salzwedel, Karen M. Grewen, Clement Vachet, Guido Gerig, Weili Lin, Wei Gao

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala–frontal, insula–frontal, and insula–sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala–frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)5860-5869
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Neuroscience
    Volume35
    Issue number14
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 8 2015

    Fingerprint

    Cocaine
    Brain
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    Drug and Narcotic Control
    Cannabis
    Arousal
    Amygdala
    Nicotine
    Antidepressive Agents
    Alcohols
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Newborn Infant

    Keywords

    • Amygdala
    • FMRI
    • Functional connectivity
    • Infant
    • Insula
    • Prenatal drug exposure

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neuroscience(all)

    Cite this

    Salzwedel, A. P., Grewen, K. M., Vachet, C., Gerig, G., Lin, W., & Gao, W. (2015). Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(14), 5860-5869. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4333-14.2015

    Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity. / Salzwedel, Andrew P.; Grewen, Karen M.; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gao, Wei.

    In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 35, No. 14, 08.04.2015, p. 5860-5869.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Salzwedel, AP, Grewen, KM, Vachet, C, Gerig, G, Lin, W & Gao, W 2015, 'Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 35, no. 14, pp. 5860-5869. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4333-14.2015
    Salzwedel, Andrew P. ; Grewen, Karen M. ; Vachet, Clement ; Gerig, Guido ; Lin, Weili ; Gao, Wei. / Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2015 ; Vol. 35, No. 14. pp. 5860-5869.
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