Predictors of the use of viagra, testosterone, and antidepressants among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men

David W. Purcell, Richard J. Wolitski, Colleen C. Hoff, Jeffrey T. Parsons, William J. Woods, Perry N. Halkitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine the use and correlates of the use of prescription drugs that may affect sexual behavior among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men. Methods: In a cross-sectional assessment of baseline data from a behavioral intervention, we recruited 1168 HIV-positive gay and bisexual men in 2000-2001 from community venues in New York City and San Francisco, and determined the point prevalence of the use of viagra, testosterone, and antidepressants. We examined bivariate and multivariate associations between the use of each drug and demographics, health status, substance use, psychological symptoms, and sexual risk. Results: The current use of antidepressants was 21%, testosterone 19%, and viagra 12%. Some viagra users reported using drugs that could interact dangerously with viagra. The use of viagra, testosterone, or antidepressants was related to unprotected receptive anal intercourse and unprotected insertive oral intercourse (UIOI) with both HIV-positive and HIV-negative/unknown-status casual partners. The use of viagra was also associated with unprotected insertive anal intercourse. In multivariate models, viagra use was associated with being older, more educated, using ketamine, and engaging in UIOI with HIV-negative/unknown-status casual partners. Testosterone use was associated with being more educated and using nitrites (poppers). Antidepressant use was associated with race, using poppers, and being more depressed. Conclusion: Prescription medications used by HIV-positive men can have unintended negative effects such as drug interactions or associations with risky sexual behavior, particularly a drug such as viagra that is fast acting, short lasting, and provides a desirable effect. Physicians should discuss these issues with patients when prescribing, and interventions should address these challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS, Supplement
Volume19
Issue number1
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Fingerprint

Antidepressive Agents
Testosterone
HIV
Sexual Behavior
Pharmaceutical Preparations
San Francisco
Prescription Drugs
Sildenafil Citrate
Sexual Minorities
Ketamine
Nitrites
Drug Interactions
Health Status
Prescriptions
Demography
Psychology
Physicians

Keywords

  • Antidepressants
  • Gay and bisexual men
  • HIV-positive
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Sexual risk behavior
  • Testosterone
  • Viagra

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Purcell, D. W., Wolitski, R. J., Hoff, C. C., Parsons, J. T., Woods, W. J., & Halkitis, P. N. (2005). Predictors of the use of viagra, testosterone, and antidepressants among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men. AIDS, Supplement, 19(1).

Predictors of the use of viagra, testosterone, and antidepressants among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men. / Purcell, David W.; Wolitski, Richard J.; Hoff, Colleen C.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Woods, William J.; Halkitis, Perry N.

In: AIDS, Supplement, Vol. 19, No. 1, 04.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Purcell, DW, Wolitski, RJ, Hoff, CC, Parsons, JT, Woods, WJ & Halkitis, PN 2005, 'Predictors of the use of viagra, testosterone, and antidepressants among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men', AIDS, Supplement, vol. 19, no. 1.
Purcell DW, Wolitski RJ, Hoff CC, Parsons JT, Woods WJ, Halkitis PN. Predictors of the use of viagra, testosterone, and antidepressants among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men. AIDS, Supplement. 2005 Apr;19(1).
Purcell, David W. ; Wolitski, Richard J. ; Hoff, Colleen C. ; Parsons, Jeffrey T. ; Woods, William J. ; Halkitis, Perry N. / Predictors of the use of viagra, testosterone, and antidepressants among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men. In: AIDS, Supplement. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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