Predicting the future of the AIDS epidemic and its consequences for the health care system of New York City

M. H. Alderman, E. E. Drucker, A. Rosenfield, Cheryl Healton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The point of this exercise is not to predict precisely the exact number of AIDS cases that will occur in any particular year. Rather, it is our aim to utilize existing data to develop a plausible scenario of the demand that this epidemic may place on the health care system of New York City in the very near future. To ignore the possibilities inherent in the empirical evidence currently available is to court a societal calamity even greater than the one already perceived. Even now, in the early phase of this epidemic, when HIV infected people occupy only 4.5% of the City's total of hospital beds, a set of emerging distortions and difficulties already threaten the integrity of the City's hospital system. A similar pattern is occurring in other cities with equivalent case rates, e.g. Newark and San Francisco. Innovation, particularly in a system so large and well established as New York's metropolitan health care establishment, which can protect the existing system while still meeting the challenge of AIDS, will be difficult and time consuming at best. But time is short, the need is great and is likely to grow rapidly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages9
JournalBulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine: Journal of Urban Health
Volume64
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1988

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Urban Hospitals
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
health care
Delivery of Health Care
San Francisco
hospital system
HIV
integrity
scenario
innovation
demand
evidence
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Predicting the future of the AIDS epidemic and its consequences for the health care system of New York City. / Alderman, M. H.; Drucker, E. E.; Rosenfield, A.; Healton, Cheryl.

In: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 64, No. 2, 1988, p. 175-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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