Predicting post-treatment narcotic use among patients terminating from methadone maintenance

Don Des Jarlais, Herman Joseph, Vincent P. Dole, James Schmeidler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Post-treatment use of narcotics was examined among a group of 687 patients who left methadone-maintenance treatment in New York City in the middle 1970s. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify variables that predicted a return to daily use of narcotics. Variables were entered in the equation starting with those that describe the patient at the time of leaving treatment and proceeding backwards through time. The multiple R2 was.44. The type of discharge, employment at discharge, and length of heroin use prior to treatment were the strongest predictors. Results from this study were also compared with those from three other large scale prediction studies; a high degree of consistency was noted across the four studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-68
Number of pages12
JournalAdvances in Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 1982

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Methadone
Narcotics
Heroin
Therapeutics
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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Predicting post-treatment narcotic use among patients terminating from methadone maintenance. / Des Jarlais, Don; Joseph, Herman; Dole, Vincent P.; Schmeidler, James.

In: Advances in Alcohol and Substance Abuse, Vol. 2, No. 1, 27.12.1982, p. 57-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Des Jarlais, Don ; Joseph, Herman ; Dole, Vincent P. ; Schmeidler, James. / Predicting post-treatment narcotic use among patients terminating from methadone maintenance. In: Advances in Alcohol and Substance Abuse. 1982 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 57-68.
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