Poverty, household chaos, and interparental aggression predict children's ability to recognize and modulate negative emotions

C. Cybele Raver, Clancy Blair, Patricia Garrett-Peters, Lynne Vernon-Feagans, Mark Greenberg, Martha Cox, Peg Burchinal, Michael Willoughby, Roger Mills-Koonce, Maureen Ittig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The following prospective longitudinal study considers the ways that protracted exposure to verbal and physical aggression between parents may take a substantial toll on emotional adjustment for 1,025 children followed from 6 to 58 months of age. Exposure to chronic poverty from infancy to early childhood as well as multiple measures of household chaos were also included as predictors of children's ability to recognize and modulate negative emotions in order to disentangle the role of interparental conflict from the socioeconomic forces that sometimes accompany it. Analyses revealed that exposure to greater levels of interparental conflict, more chaos in the household, and a higher number of years in poverty can be empirically distinguished as key contributors to 58-month-olds' ability to recognize and modulate negative emotion. Implications for models of experiential canalization of emotional processes within the context of adversity are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-708
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 21 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Poverty, household chaos, and interparental aggression predict children's ability to recognize and modulate negative emotions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Raver, C. C., Blair, C., Garrett-Peters, P., Vernon-Feagans, L., Greenberg, M., Cox, M., Burchinal, P., Willoughby, M., Mills-Koonce, R., & Ittig, M. (2015). Poverty, household chaos, and interparental aggression predict children's ability to recognize and modulate negative emotions. Development and Psychopathology, 27(3), 695-708. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579414000935