Poverty as a predictor of 4-year-olds' executive function: new perspectives on models of differential susceptibility.

C. Cybele Raver, Clancy Blair, Michael Willoughby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a predominantly low-income, population-based longitudinal sample of 1,259 children followed from birth, results suggest that chronic exposure to poverty and the strains of financial hardship were each uniquely predictive of young children's performance on measures of executive functioning. Results suggest that temperament-based vulnerability serves as a statistical moderator of the link between poverty-related risk and children's executive functioning. Implications for models of ecology and biology in shaping the development of children's self-regulation are discussed. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-304
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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Executive Function
Poverty
poverty
Temperament
Child Development
Ecology
moderator
self-regulation
Parturition
ecology
biology
vulnerability
low income
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies
  • Demography

Cite this

Poverty as a predictor of 4-year-olds' executive function : new perspectives on models of differential susceptibility. / Raver, C. Cybele; Blair, Clancy; Willoughby, Michael.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 49, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 292-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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