Posttraumatic stress disorder in the short and medium term following the World Trade Center attack among Asian Americans

Winnie W. Kung, Xinhua Liu, Emily Goldmann, Debbie Huang, Xiaoran Wang, Keon Kim, Patricia Kim, Larry Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated patterns of probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and their predictors among 2,431 Asian American and 31,455 non-Hispanic White World Trade Center (WTC) Registry participants 2-3 years and 5-6 years after the WTC attack. Participants were divided into four PTSD pattern groups: resilient, remitted, delayed onset, and chronic. Asians had a lower proportion in the resilient group (76.5% vs. 79.8%), a higher proportion in the chronic (8.6% vs. 7.4%) and remitted (5.9% vs. 3.4%) groups, and a similar proportion in the delayed onset group (about 9%) compared to Whites. In multinomial logistic regression analyses, disaster exposure, immigrant status, lower income, pre-attack depression/anxiety, and lower respiratory symptoms were associated with increased odds of chronic and delayed onset PTSD (vs. resilience) among both races. Education and employment were protective against chronic and delayed onset PTSD among Whites only. These results can inform targeted outreach efforts to enhance prevention and treatment for Asians affected by future events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1075-1091
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume46
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Asian Americans
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Disasters
Registries
Anxiety
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Depression
Education
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Posttraumatic stress disorder in the short and medium term following the World Trade Center attack among Asian Americans. / Kung, Winnie W.; Liu, Xinhua; Goldmann, Emily; Huang, Debbie; Wang, Xiaoran; Kim, Keon; Kim, Patricia; Yang, Larry.

In: Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 46, No. 8, 01.11.2018, p. 1075-1091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kung, Winnie W. ; Liu, Xinhua ; Goldmann, Emily ; Huang, Debbie ; Wang, Xiaoran ; Kim, Keon ; Kim, Patricia ; Yang, Larry. / Posttraumatic stress disorder in the short and medium term following the World Trade Center attack among Asian Americans. In: Journal of Community Psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 46, No. 8. pp. 1075-1091.
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