Postsynaptic receptor trafficking underlying a form of associative learning

Simon Rumpel, Joseph Ledoux, Anthony Zador, Roberto Malinow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To elucidate molecular, cellular, and circuit changes that occur in the brain during learning, we investigated the role of a glutamate receptor subtype in fear conditioning. In this form of learning, animals associate two stimuli, such as a tone and a shock. Here we report that fear conditioning drives AMPA-type glutamate receptors into the synapse of a large fraction of postsynaptic neurons in the lateral amygdala, a brain structure essential for this learning process. Furthermore, memory was reduced if AMPA receptor synaptic incorporation was blocked in as few as 10 to 20% of lateral amygdala neurons. Thus, the encoding of memories in the lateral amygdala is mediated by AMPA receptor trafficking, is widely distributed, and displays little redundancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-88
Number of pages6
JournalScience
Volume308
Issue number5718
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2005

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AMPA Receptors
Amygdala
Glutamate Receptors
Learning
Fear
Neurons
Brain
Synapses
Shock
Conditioning (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Postsynaptic receptor trafficking underlying a form of associative learning. / Rumpel, Simon; Ledoux, Joseph; Zador, Anthony; Malinow, Roberto.

In: Science, Vol. 308, No. 5718, 01.04.2005, p. 83-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rumpel, Simon ; Ledoux, Joseph ; Zador, Anthony ; Malinow, Roberto. / Postsynaptic receptor trafficking underlying a form of associative learning. In: Science. 2005 ; Vol. 308, No. 5718. pp. 83-88.
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