Physics of colloids in space plus (PCS+)

P. M. Chaikin, W. B. Russel, W. Kopacka, A. van Blaaderen, W. V. Meyer, M. P. Doherty

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The Physics of Colloids in Space Plus (PCS+) experiment consists of light scattering and rheological measurements probing the essential features of the hard sphere disorder-order transition and the properties of the ordered solid phase that results. Several samples, in custom-designed cells at fixed volume fractions, will permit measurements from the disordered fluid phase, through the coexistence region, into the fully crystalline solid, and beyond toward random close packing. The dispersions will consist of monodisperse colloidal hard spheres 0.65-0.70 micron diameter with cores of poly(methylmethacrylate) and a comb-graft co-polymer stabilizer in a mixture of decalin and tetralin with an almost matching refractive index. The information obtained will answer fundamental questions in condensed matter physics regarding this most fundamental of transitions between liquid and solid phases. An extensive theoretical basis, from computer simulations and statistical mechanical theories, complements numerous experimental studies with similar model systems addressing one or more aspects of the phenomena. However, gravitational settling inevitably complicates the measurements and introduces ambiguities. With PCS+ we seek to sweep these aside in completing a comprehensive study capitalizing on the techniques and knowledge developed in the preceeding ground-based and flight experiments. With this space experiment we aim to • understand why glasses do not persist in microgravity, • correlate the visual appearance of dendrites with data on nucleation and growth from Bragg scattering, and •correlate depletion observed by low angle scattering with the visual appearance of dendrites.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publication2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization
    StatePublished - 2001
    Event2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization - Cape Canaveral, FL, United States
    Duration: Oct 15 2001Oct 18 2001

    Other

    Other2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization
    CountryUnited States
    CityCape Canaveral, FL
    Period10/15/0110/18/01

    Fingerprint

    colloid
    Colloids
    colloids
    physics
    Physics
    dendrites
    solid phases
    mechanical theory
    scattering
    Condensed matter physics
    Scattering
    condensed matter physics
    Dendrites (metallography)
    Order disorder transitions
    experiment
    Experiments
    Microgravity
    settling
    light scattering
    refractive index

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Space and Planetary Science
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    Cite this

    Chaikin, P. M., Russel, W. B., Kopacka, W., van Blaaderen, A., Meyer, W. V., & Doherty, M. P. (2001). Physics of colloids in space plus (PCS+). In 2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization

    Physics of colloids in space plus (PCS+). / Chaikin, P. M.; Russel, W. B.; Kopacka, W.; van Blaaderen, A.; Meyer, W. V.; Doherty, M. P.

    2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization. 2001.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Chaikin, PM, Russel, WB, Kopacka, W, van Blaaderen, A, Meyer, WV & Doherty, MP 2001, Physics of colloids in space plus (PCS+). in 2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization. 2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization, Cape Canaveral, FL, United States, 10/15/01.
    Chaikin PM, Russel WB, Kopacka W, van Blaaderen A, Meyer WV, Doherty MP. Physics of colloids in space plus (PCS+). In 2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization. 2001
    Chaikin, P. M. ; Russel, W. B. ; Kopacka, W. ; van Blaaderen, A. ; Meyer, W. V. ; Doherty, M. P. / Physics of colloids in space plus (PCS+). 2001 Conference and Exhibit on International Space Station Utilization. 2001.
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    AU - Russel, W. B.

    AU - Kopacka, W.

    AU - van Blaaderen, A.

    AU - Meyer, W. V.

    AU - Doherty, M. P.

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