Physician's attitudes toward AIDS at different career stages: a comparison of internists and surgeons.

M. J. Yedidia, J. K. Barr, Carolyn Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Physicians' responses to AIDS at different career stages and in different specialties were studied by surveying house staff (N = 438), faculty (N = 363), and applicants (N = 487) at six residency programs in internal medicine and six in surgery. House staff had more negative outlooks than senior medical students and faculty, reporting greater fear of exposure to AIDS and greater unwillingness to treat AIDS patients. Surgeons were more negative than internists on these dimensions. For all groups, concern about possible negative educational consequences of treating AIDS patients was largely a function of their amount of contact with AIDS patients. Comparing willingness to treat AIDS and nine other conditions, AIDS consistently ranked low, along with Alzheimer's disease, alcoholism, and drug dependency. The findings have practical implications for hospitals and training programs. In addition, they raise issues concerning the impact of training on professional socialization, and call into question physicians' commitment to the professional norm of treating all patients regardless of provider self-interest, patient social characteristics, or medical uncertainty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272-284
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health and Social Behavior
Volume34
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1993

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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
physician
career
Physicians
Internship and Residency
staff
Medical Faculties
Socialization
Internal Medicine
Surgeons
Medical Students
applicant
dementia
alcoholism
surgery
socialization
Alcoholism
Uncertainty
Fear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Physician's attitudes toward AIDS at different career stages : a comparison of internists and surgeons. / Yedidia, M. J.; Barr, J. K.; Berry, Carolyn.

In: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Vol. 34, No. 3, 09.1993, p. 272-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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