Physical, behavioral, and cognitive effects of prenatal tobacco and postnatal secondhand smoke exposure

Sherry Zhou, David G. Rosenthal, Scott Sherman, Judith Zelikoff, Terry Gordon, Michael Weitzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this review is to examine the rapidly expanding literature regarding the effects of prenatal tobacco and postnatal secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure on child health and development. Mechanisms of SHS exposure are reviewed, including critical periods during which exposure to tobacco products appears to be particularly harmful to the developing fetus and child. The biological, biochemical, and neurologic effects of the small fraction of identified components of SHS are described. Research describing these adverse effects of both in utero and childhood exposure is reviewed, including findings from both animal models and humans. The following adverse physical outcomes are discussed: sudden infant death syndrome, low birth weight, decreased head circumference, respiratory infections, otitis media, asthma, childhood cancer, hearing loss, dental caries, and the metabolic syndrome. In addition, the association between the following adverse cognitive and behavioral outcomes and such exposures is described: conduct disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, poor academic achievement, and cognitive impairment. The evidence supporting the adverse effects of SHS exposure is extensive yet rapidly expanding due to improving technology and increased awareness of this profound public health problem. The growing use of alternative tobacco products, such as hookahs (a.k.a. waterpipes), and the scant literature on possible effects from prenatal and secondhand smoke exposure from these products are also discussed. A review of the current knowledge of this important subject has implications for future research as well as public policy and clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-241
Number of pages23
JournalCurrent Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care
Volume44
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Tobacco
Tobacco Products
Conduct Disorder
Sudden Infant Death
Otitis Media
Dental Caries
Low Birth Weight Infant
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Public Policy
Child Development
Hearing Loss
Respiratory Tract Infections
Nervous System
Fetus
Asthma
Animal Models
Public Health
Head
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Physical, behavioral, and cognitive effects of prenatal tobacco and postnatal secondhand smoke exposure. / Zhou, Sherry; Rosenthal, David G.; Sherman, Scott; Zelikoff, Judith; Gordon, Terry; Weitzman, Michael.

In: Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care, Vol. 44, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 219-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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