Physical activity is related to function and fatigue but not pain in women with fibromyalgia

Baseline analyses from the Fibromyalgia Activity Study with TENS (FAST)

Ericka Merriwether, Laura A. Frey-Law, Barbara A. Rakel, Miriam B. Zimmerman, Dana L. Dailey, Carol G.T. Vance, Meenakshi Golchha, Katherine M. Geasland, Ruth Chimenti, Leslie J. Crofford, Kathleen A. Sluka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although exercise is an effective treatment for fibromyalgia, the relationships between lifestyle physical activity and multiple symptomology domains of fibromyalgia are not clear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively examine the relationships between lifestyle physical activity with multiple outcome domains in women with fibromyalgia, including pain, fatigue, function, pain-related psychological constructs, and quality of life. Methods: Women (N = 171), aged 20 to 70 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia, recruited from an ongoing two-site clinical trial were included in this prespecified subgroup analysis of baseline data. Physical activity was assessed using self-report and accelerometry. Symptomology was assessed using questionnaires of perceived physical function, quality of life, fatigue, pain intensity and interference, disease impact, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. In addition, quantitative sensory testing of pain sensitivity and performance-based physical function were assessed. Correlation coefficients, regression analyses and between-group differences in symptomology by activity level were assessed, controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). Results: Lifestyle physical activity was most closely associated with select measures of physical function and fatigue, regardless of age and BMI. Those who performed the lowest levels of lifestyle physical activity had poorer functional outcomes and greater fatigue than those with higher physical activity participation. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or pain-related psychological constructs were observed. Conclusions: Lifestyle physical activity is not equally related to all aspects of fibromyalgia symptomology. Lifestyle physical activity levels have the strongest correlations with function, physical quality of life, and movement fatigue in women with fibromyalgia. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or psychological constructs were observed. These data suggest that physical activity levels are more likely to affect function and fatigue, but have negligible relationships with pain and pain-related psychological constructs, in women with fibromyalgia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number199
JournalArthritis Research and Therapy
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 29 2018

Fingerprint

Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
Fibromyalgia
Fatigue
Exercise
Pain
Life Style
Psychology
Quality of Life
Body Mass Index
Catastrophization
Accelerometry
Self Report
Fear

Keywords

  • Accelerometry
  • ActiGraph
  • Fatigue
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Function
  • IPAQ
  • Pain
  • PROMIS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Physical activity is related to function and fatigue but not pain in women with fibromyalgia : Baseline analyses from the Fibromyalgia Activity Study with TENS (FAST). / Merriwether, Ericka; Frey-Law, Laura A.; Rakel, Barbara A.; Zimmerman, Miriam B.; Dailey, Dana L.; Vance, Carol G.T.; Golchha, Meenakshi; Geasland, Katherine M.; Chimenti, Ruth; Crofford, Leslie J.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

In: Arthritis Research and Therapy, Vol. 20, No. 1, 199, 29.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Merriwether, Ericka ; Frey-Law, Laura A. ; Rakel, Barbara A. ; Zimmerman, Miriam B. ; Dailey, Dana L. ; Vance, Carol G.T. ; Golchha, Meenakshi ; Geasland, Katherine M. ; Chimenti, Ruth ; Crofford, Leslie J. ; Sluka, Kathleen A. / Physical activity is related to function and fatigue but not pain in women with fibromyalgia : Baseline analyses from the Fibromyalgia Activity Study with TENS (FAST). In: Arthritis Research and Therapy. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Although exercise is an effective treatment for fibromyalgia, the relationships between lifestyle physical activity and multiple symptomology domains of fibromyalgia are not clear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively examine the relationships between lifestyle physical activity with multiple outcome domains in women with fibromyalgia, including pain, fatigue, function, pain-related psychological constructs, and quality of life. Methods: Women (N = 171), aged 20 to 70 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia, recruited from an ongoing two-site clinical trial were included in this prespecified subgroup analysis of baseline data. Physical activity was assessed using self-report and accelerometry. Symptomology was assessed using questionnaires of perceived physical function, quality of life, fatigue, pain intensity and interference, disease impact, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. In addition, quantitative sensory testing of pain sensitivity and performance-based physical function were assessed. Correlation coefficients, regression analyses and between-group differences in symptomology by activity level were assessed, controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). Results: Lifestyle physical activity was most closely associated with select measures of physical function and fatigue, regardless of age and BMI. Those who performed the lowest levels of lifestyle physical activity had poorer functional outcomes and greater fatigue than those with higher physical activity participation. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or pain-related psychological constructs were observed. Conclusions: Lifestyle physical activity is not equally related to all aspects of fibromyalgia symptomology. Lifestyle physical activity levels have the strongest correlations with function, physical quality of life, and movement fatigue in women with fibromyalgia. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or psychological constructs were observed. These data suggest that physical activity levels are more likely to affect function and fatigue, but have negligible relationships with pain and pain-related psychological constructs, in women with fibromyalgia.",
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AU - Rakel, Barbara A.

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AU - Dailey, Dana L.

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AB - Background: Although exercise is an effective treatment for fibromyalgia, the relationships between lifestyle physical activity and multiple symptomology domains of fibromyalgia are not clear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively examine the relationships between lifestyle physical activity with multiple outcome domains in women with fibromyalgia, including pain, fatigue, function, pain-related psychological constructs, and quality of life. Methods: Women (N = 171), aged 20 to 70 years, diagnosed with fibromyalgia, recruited from an ongoing two-site clinical trial were included in this prespecified subgroup analysis of baseline data. Physical activity was assessed using self-report and accelerometry. Symptomology was assessed using questionnaires of perceived physical function, quality of life, fatigue, pain intensity and interference, disease impact, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement. In addition, quantitative sensory testing of pain sensitivity and performance-based physical function were assessed. Correlation coefficients, regression analyses and between-group differences in symptomology by activity level were assessed, controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). Results: Lifestyle physical activity was most closely associated with select measures of physical function and fatigue, regardless of age and BMI. Those who performed the lowest levels of lifestyle physical activity had poorer functional outcomes and greater fatigue than those with higher physical activity participation. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or pain-related psychological constructs were observed. Conclusions: Lifestyle physical activity is not equally related to all aspects of fibromyalgia symptomology. Lifestyle physical activity levels have the strongest correlations with function, physical quality of life, and movement fatigue in women with fibromyalgia. No relationships between lifestyle physical activity and pain, pain sensitivity, or psychological constructs were observed. These data suggest that physical activity levels are more likely to affect function and fatigue, but have negligible relationships with pain and pain-related psychological constructs, in women with fibromyalgia.

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