Persistent activity in the prefrontal cortex during working memory

Clayton E. Curtis, Mark D'Esposito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays a crucial role in working memory. Notably, persistent activity in the DLPFC is often observed during the retention interval of delayed response tasks. The code carried by the persistent activity remains unclear, however. We critically evaluate how well recent findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies are compatible with current models of the role of the DLFPC in working memory. These new findings suggest that the DLPFC aids in the maintenance of information by directing attention to internal representations of sensory stimuli and motor plans that are stored in more posterior regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-423
Number of pages9
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

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Prefrontal Cortex
Short-Term Memory
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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Persistent activity in the prefrontal cortex during working memory. / Curtis, Clayton E.; D'Esposito, Mark.

In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 9, 01.09.2003, p. 415-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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