Perirhinal-Hippocampal Connectivity during Reactivation Is a Marker for Object-Based Memory Consolidation

KaiaL Vilberg, Lila Davachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study utilized event-related fMRI to address the role of the human perirhinal cortex (PRC), and its interactions with the hippocampus, inmemory consolidation. Participants encoded object-based and scene-based associations and then restudied them either after a "long" or "short" delay during which consolidation could occur. We found that BOLD activation in left PRC and hippocampal-PRC functional connectivity were significantly enhanced during the restudy of the long versus short delay word-object pairs. Secondly, hippocampal-PRC connectivity during restudy of the long delay word-object pairs predicted a subsequent reduction in associative forgetting. By contrast, hippocampal-PRC connectivity did not predict subsequent resistance to forgetting for the short delay or novel associations. Together, these results provide evidence for perirhinal-hippocampal interactions in the selective consolidation of object-based associative memories and provide support for the notion that, during early stages of consolidation, memories become more distributed across brain regions

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1232-1242
Number of pages11
JournalNeuron
Volume79
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2013

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Hippocampus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Perirhinal Cortex
Memory Consolidation
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Perirhinal-Hippocampal Connectivity during Reactivation Is a Marker for Object-Based Memory Consolidation. / Vilberg, KaiaL; Davachi, Lila.

In: Neuron, Vol. 79, No. 6, 18.09.2013, p. 1232-1242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vilberg, KaiaL ; Davachi, Lila. / Perirhinal-Hippocampal Connectivity during Reactivation Is a Marker for Object-Based Memory Consolidation. In: Neuron. 2013 ; Vol. 79, No. 6. pp. 1232-1242.
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