Perinatal safety: From concept to nursing practice

Audrey Lyndon, Holly Powell Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians' individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient's best interest can be viewed as their "agency for safety." However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their role of advocacy is missing in many perinatal care settings. This article draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse's role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-31
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Perinatal Care
Nursing
Safety
Nurses
Organizational Culture
Nurse's Role
Accidents
Communication
Parturition

Keywords

  • High reliability
  • Patient safety
  • Perinatal nursing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics
  • Critical Care
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

Perinatal safety : From concept to nursing practice. / Lyndon, Audrey; Kennedy, Holly Powell.

In: Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 22-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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