Perceptions of barriers and facilitators of cancer early detection among low-income minority women in community health centers

Gbenga Ogedegbe, Andrea N. Cassells, Christina M. Robinson, Katherine DuHamel, Jonathan N. Tobin, Carol H. Sox, Allen J. Dietrich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

African-American and Hispanic women receive fewer indicated cancer early detection services than do majority women. Low rates of cancer screening may, in part, explain the disproportionately higher rates of cancer deaths in this population. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore through individual interviews the perceptions of barriers and facilitators of colorectal, cervical and breast cancer screening among 187 low-income, primarily minority women in four New-York-City-based community/migrant health centers. We identified various barriers and facilitators within each of these categories. Clinician recommendation was the most commonly cited encouragement to cancer screening. Other facilitators of cancer screening identified by patients included personal medical history, such as the presence of a symptom. The perception of screening as routine was cited as a facilitator far more commonly for mammography and Pap tests than for either of the colorectal screenings. Less commonly cited facilitators were insurance coverage and information from the media. The most common barriers were a lack of cancer screening knowledge, patients' perception of good health or absence of symptoms attributable to ill health, fear of pain from the cancer test and a lack of a clinician recommendation. Using standard qualitative techniques, patients' responses were analyzed and grouped into a taxonomy of three major categories reflecting: 1) patients' attitudes and beliefs, 2) their social network experience and 3) accessibility of services. This taxonomy may serve as a useful framework for primary care providers to educate and counsel their patients about cancer screening behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-170
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume97
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2005

Fingerprint

Community Health Centers
Early Detection of Cancer
Papanicolaou Test
Insurance Coverage
Health
Mammography
Hispanic Americans
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Social Support
African Americans
Fear
Colorectal Neoplasms
Primary Health Care
Interviews
Breast Neoplasms
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Cancer screening
  • Community health centers
  • Ethnic groups
  • Facilitator
  • Low-income population
  • Primary healthcare
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ogedegbe, G., Cassells, A. N., Robinson, C. M., DuHamel, K., Tobin, J. N., Sox, C. H., & Dietrich, A. J. (2005). Perceptions of barriers and facilitators of cancer early detection among low-income minority women in community health centers. Journal of the National Medical Association, 97(2), 162-170.

Perceptions of barriers and facilitators of cancer early detection among low-income minority women in community health centers. / Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Cassells, Andrea N.; Robinson, Christina M.; DuHamel, Katherine; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Sox, Carol H.; Dietrich, Allen J.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 97, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 162-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ogedegbe, Gbenga ; Cassells, Andrea N. ; Robinson, Christina M. ; DuHamel, Katherine ; Tobin, Jonathan N. ; Sox, Carol H. ; Dietrich, Allen J. / Perceptions of barriers and facilitators of cancer early detection among low-income minority women in community health centers. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 2005 ; Vol. 97, No. 2. pp. 162-170.
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