Perceptions of adolescent girls with LD regarding self-determination and postsecondary transition planning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Existing research has documented disparate outcomes between young women and men with disabilities in many transition domains, including employment, postsecondary education, and parenting. Similarly, students with learning disabilities (LD) have unique postsecondary transition needs. Promoting self-determination and active participation in transition is recommended in practice regardless of gender and disability type. Because both gender and disability status impact the postsecondary trajectories of young adults, helping young women with LD meet the demands of adulthood, including responding to opportunities for self-determination, is a salient issue. Using qualitative interview data and analysis, this study examined the perceptions of adolescent females with LD regarding self-determination during transition. Findings indicated that participants perceived they were self-determining individuals, yet several key component skills necessary for self-determination were missing. Connections to practice and future research are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-45
Number of pages15
JournalLearning Disability Quarterly
Volume30
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Personal Autonomy
Learning Disorders
self-determination
learning disability
adolescent
planning
disability
Nonprofessional Education
female adolescent
gender
qualitative interview
adulthood
young adult
Young Adult
Interviews
Students
participation
Research
education
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Education
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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