Perceived risk, peer influences, and injection partner type predict receptive syringe sharing among young adult injection drug users in five U.S. cities

Susan L. Bailey, Lawrence J. Ouellet, Mary Ellen Mackesy-Amiti, Elizabeth T. Golub, Holly Hagan, Sharon M. Hudson, Mary H. Latka, Weihua Gao, Richard S. Garfein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study examined risk factors for receptive syringe sharing (RSS) during illicit drug injection by persons 15-30 years old in five U.S. cities. Methods: Participants were recruited through street outreach and respondent-driven referrals in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle between May 2002 and January 2004. Surveys of drug use, sexual behaviors, and correlates were administered through audio computer-assisted self-interviews at baseline and, for the subset of participants who enrolled in an HIV/HCV prevention intervention trial, at 3-months and 6-months post-baseline. The proportions of injections involving RSS at baseline and at follow-up were used as outcomes in multivariate models that adjusted for intervention effects. Results: At baseline, 54% of 3128 participants reported RSS in the past 3 months. RSS decreased to 21% at 6-months post-baseline for the combined trial arms. Participants were more likely to report RSS if they perceived that their peers were not against RSS and if they injected with sex partners. Lower levels of perceived risk of infection with HIV (baseline, p < .001) or HCV (follow-up, p < .001) through RSS were also significant predictors of greater RSS. Conclusions: Perceived risks, peer influences, and type of injection partner were robust predictors of RSS. Perceived risks and peer influences are particularly amenable to intervention efforts that may prevent RSS in this age group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume91
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Needle Sharing
Syringes
Drug Users
young adult
Young Adult
drug
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations
drug use
age group
human being
Peer Influence
interview
Baltimore
Los Angeles
Street Drugs
Sexual Behavior
HIV Infections
Referral and Consultation
Age Groups

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Behavioral intervention
  • Injection drug use
  • Longitudinal
  • Needle sharing
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Perceived risk, peer influences, and injection partner type predict receptive syringe sharing among young adult injection drug users in five U.S. cities. / Bailey, Susan L.; Ouellet, Lawrence J.; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Hagan, Holly; Hudson, Sharon M.; Latka, Mary H.; Gao, Weihua; Garfein, Richard S.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 91, No. SUPPL. 1, 11.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bailey, Susan L. ; Ouellet, Lawrence J. ; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen ; Golub, Elizabeth T. ; Hagan, Holly ; Hudson, Sharon M. ; Latka, Mary H. ; Gao, Weihua ; Garfein, Richard S. / Perceived risk, peer influences, and injection partner type predict receptive syringe sharing among young adult injection drug users in five U.S. cities. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2007 ; Vol. 91, No. SUPPL. 1.
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abstract = "Objectives: This study examined risk factors for receptive syringe sharing (RSS) during illicit drug injection by persons 15-30 years old in five U.S. cities. Methods: Participants were recruited through street outreach and respondent-driven referrals in Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle between May 2002 and January 2004. Surveys of drug use, sexual behaviors, and correlates were administered through audio computer-assisted self-interviews at baseline and, for the subset of participants who enrolled in an HIV/HCV prevention intervention trial, at 3-months and 6-months post-baseline. The proportions of injections involving RSS at baseline and at follow-up were used as outcomes in multivariate models that adjusted for intervention effects. Results: At baseline, 54{\%} of 3128 participants reported RSS in the past 3 months. RSS decreased to 21{\%} at 6-months post-baseline for the combined trial arms. Participants were more likely to report RSS if they perceived that their peers were not against RSS and if they injected with sex partners. Lower levels of perceived risk of infection with HIV (baseline, p < .001) or HCV (follow-up, p < .001) through RSS were also significant predictors of greater RSS. Conclusions: Perceived risks, peer influences, and type of injection partner were robust predictors of RSS. Perceived risks and peer influences are particularly amenable to intervention efforts that may prevent RSS in this age group.",
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AU - Golub, Elizabeth T.

AU - Hagan, Holly

AU - Hudson, Sharon M.

AU - Latka, Mary H.

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