Perceived helpfulness of treatments for myofascial TMD as a function of comorbid widespread pain

Vivian Santiago, Karen Raphael

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorder (mTMD) comorbid with fibromyalgia (FM) receive different treatments or respond differently to these treatments than mTMD-only patients. Materials and methods: A total of 125 mTMD+ women were enrolled (26 FM+ and 98 FM−). mTMD and FM were assessed via clinical research examinations. Treatment histories and self-reported treatment-related improvement were obtained via interview. Results: The top 3 most common treatments reported were oral appliances (59%), physical therapy (54%), and jaw exercises at home (34%). Use of alternative medicine was reported more frequently among FM+ women, but self-reported improvement did not differ by comorbid FM. Physical therapy was as likely reported by FM status but self-reported improvement scores trended higher for FM+ women. Conclusions: Oral appliances were as likely to be reported by FM comorbid as FM− women. Oral appliances did not outperform self-management treatments on self-reported improvement of facial pain. Clinical relevance: Results support the use of self-management as first-line treatment for mTMD and potential utility of inquiring about widespread pain for treatment planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Oral Investigations
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Fibromyalgia
Pain
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Therapeutics
Self Care
Facial Pain
Complementary Therapies
Jaw
Interviews
Exercise

Keywords

  • Facial pain
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Self-reported improvement
  • Temporomandibular disorders
  • Widespread pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "Perceived helpfulness of treatments for myofascial TMD as a function of comorbid widespread pain",
abstract = "Objective: This study examined whether patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorder (mTMD) comorbid with fibromyalgia (FM) receive different treatments or respond differently to these treatments than mTMD-only patients. Materials and methods: A total of 125 mTMD+ women were enrolled (26 FM+ and 98 FM−). mTMD and FM were assessed via clinical research examinations. Treatment histories and self-reported treatment-related improvement were obtained via interview. Results: The top 3 most common treatments reported were oral appliances (59{\%}), physical therapy (54{\%}), and jaw exercises at home (34{\%}). Use of alternative medicine was reported more frequently among FM+ women, but self-reported improvement did not differ by comorbid FM. Physical therapy was as likely reported by FM status but self-reported improvement scores trended higher for FM+ women. Conclusions: Oral appliances were as likely to be reported by FM comorbid as FM− women. Oral appliances did not outperform self-management treatments on self-reported improvement of facial pain. Clinical relevance: Results support the use of self-management as first-line treatment for mTMD and potential utility of inquiring about widespread pain for treatment planning.",
keywords = "Facial pain, Fibromyalgia, Self-reported improvement, Temporomandibular disorders, Widespread pain",
author = "Vivian Santiago and Karen Raphael",
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doi = "10.1007/s00784-018-02797-6",
language = "English (US)",
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AU - Raphael, Karen

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N2 - Objective: This study examined whether patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorder (mTMD) comorbid with fibromyalgia (FM) receive different treatments or respond differently to these treatments than mTMD-only patients. Materials and methods: A total of 125 mTMD+ women were enrolled (26 FM+ and 98 FM−). mTMD and FM were assessed via clinical research examinations. Treatment histories and self-reported treatment-related improvement were obtained via interview. Results: The top 3 most common treatments reported were oral appliances (59%), physical therapy (54%), and jaw exercises at home (34%). Use of alternative medicine was reported more frequently among FM+ women, but self-reported improvement did not differ by comorbid FM. Physical therapy was as likely reported by FM status but self-reported improvement scores trended higher for FM+ women. Conclusions: Oral appliances were as likely to be reported by FM comorbid as FM− women. Oral appliances did not outperform self-management treatments on self-reported improvement of facial pain. Clinical relevance: Results support the use of self-management as first-line treatment for mTMD and potential utility of inquiring about widespread pain for treatment planning.

AB - Objective: This study examined whether patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorder (mTMD) comorbid with fibromyalgia (FM) receive different treatments or respond differently to these treatments than mTMD-only patients. Materials and methods: A total of 125 mTMD+ women were enrolled (26 FM+ and 98 FM−). mTMD and FM were assessed via clinical research examinations. Treatment histories and self-reported treatment-related improvement were obtained via interview. Results: The top 3 most common treatments reported were oral appliances (59%), physical therapy (54%), and jaw exercises at home (34%). Use of alternative medicine was reported more frequently among FM+ women, but self-reported improvement did not differ by comorbid FM. Physical therapy was as likely reported by FM status but self-reported improvement scores trended higher for FM+ women. Conclusions: Oral appliances were as likely to be reported by FM comorbid as FM− women. Oral appliances did not outperform self-management treatments on self-reported improvement of facial pain. Clinical relevance: Results support the use of self-management as first-line treatment for mTMD and potential utility of inquiring about widespread pain for treatment planning.

KW - Facial pain

KW - Fibromyalgia

KW - Self-reported improvement

KW - Temporomandibular disorders

KW - Widespread pain

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