Perceived discrimination and cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults living with HIV in China.

Zheng Zhu, Yan Hu , Weijie Xing , Mengdi Guo , Bei Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Middle-aged and older adults with HIV experience double discrimination and cognitive impairment due to both their HIV status and their age. However, the relationship between perceived discrimination and self-reported cognitive ability in middle-aged and older people living with HIV (PLWH) is less clear. We measured self-reported perceived discrimination and cognitive ability using the Expanded Everyday Discrimination Scale and the subscale of the AIDS Health Assessment Questionnaire (AIDS-HAQ). The study sample included 324 middle-aged and older PLWH (over 45 years old) from five designated HIV hospitals in three regions (east coast, middle, and southwest regions) of China. The descriptive analysis showed that 45.37% of the participants reported perceiving discrimination at least once in the past twelve months, and 47.22% reported having at least one type of cognitive impairment. Multiple linear regression results showed that higher levels of perceived discrimination (β = −0.121, P = 0.036) were significantly associated with lower levels of self-reported cognitive ability after controlling for several covariates, including sociodemographic variables, mental health status, health behaviors, and social support. A longer duration of HIV was also related to a lower level of self-reported cognitive ability. Our findings indicate that perceived discrimination is related to self-reported cognitive ability and suggest that counseling services and support systems should be developed to reduce age- and disease-associated discrimination. A reduction in perceived discrimination would improve not only overall wellbeing but also cognitive ability in later life.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2019

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Cognition
Aptitude
China
discrimination
HIV
cognitive ability
Middle East
Discrimination (Psychology)
Health Behavior
Social Support
Health Status
health behavior
Counseling
Linear Models
Mental Health
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
health status
social support
counseling
AIDS

Keywords

  • HIV
  • AIDS
  • aging
  • stigma
  • Cognitive ability

Cite this

Perceived discrimination and cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults living with HIV in China. / Zhu, Zheng; Hu , Yan ; Xing , Weijie ; Guo , Mengdi ; Wu, Bei.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, 03.04.2019, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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