Peering peer-to-peer providers

Hari Balakrishnan, Scott Shenker, Michael Walfish

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The early peer-to-peer applications eschewed commercial arrangements and instead established a grass-roots model in which the collection of end-users provided their own distributed computational infrastructure. While this cooperative end-user approach works well in many application settings, it does not provide a sufficiently stable platform for certain peer-to-peer applications (e.g., DHTs as a building block for network services). Assuming such a stable platform isn't freely provided by a benefactor (such as NSF), we must ask whether DHTs could be deployed in a competitive commercial environment. The key issue is whether a multiplicity of DHT services can coordinate to provide a single coherent DHT service, much the way ISPs peer to provide a completely connected Internet. In this paper, we describe various approaches for DHT peering and discuss some of the related performance and incentive issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages104-114
Number of pages11
Volume3640 LNCS
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event4th International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems, IPTPS 2005 - Ithaca, NY, United States
Duration: Feb 24 2005Feb 25 2005

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume3640 LNCS
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other4th International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems, IPTPS 2005
CountryUnited States
CityIthaca, NY
Period2/24/052/25/05

Fingerprint

Peer to Peer
Poaceae
Internet
Motivation
Incentives
Building Blocks
Arrangement
Multiplicity
Infrastructure
Roots
Model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Balakrishnan, H., Shenker, S., & Walfish, M. (2005). Peering peer-to-peer providers. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 3640 LNCS, pp. 104-114). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3640 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/11558989_10

Peering peer-to-peer providers. / Balakrishnan, Hari; Shenker, Scott; Walfish, Michael.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 3640 LNCS 2005. p. 104-114 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 3640 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Balakrishnan, H, Shenker, S & Walfish, M 2005, Peering peer-to-peer providers. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 3640 LNCS, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 3640 LNCS, pp. 104-114, 4th International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Systems, IPTPS 2005, Ithaca, NY, United States, 2/24/05. https://doi.org/10.1007/11558989_10
Balakrishnan H, Shenker S, Walfish M. Peering peer-to-peer providers. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 3640 LNCS. 2005. p. 104-114. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/11558989_10
Balakrishnan, Hari ; Shenker, Scott ; Walfish, Michael. / Peering peer-to-peer providers. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 3640 LNCS 2005. pp. 104-114 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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