Patterns in first and daily cigarette initiation among youth and young adults from 2002 to 2015

Jennifer Cantrell, Morgane Bennett, Paul Mowery, Haijun Xiao, Jessica Rath, Elizabeth Hair, Donna Vallone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study’s objective was to describe long-term trends and patterns in first cigarette use (cigarette initiation) and daily cigarette use (daily initiation) among youth and young adults in the U.S. We used cross-sectional survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002–2015, to estimate annual incidence of first cigarette use (N = 270,556) and first daily cigarette use (N = 373,464) for each year by age groups, race/ethnicity and gender, examining trends over time and the average annual change in initiation for each group. Several clear patterns emerged: 1) cigarette initiation and daily initiation significantly decreased over time among those aged 12–14 and 15–17 and these trends were consistent among nearly all racial/ethnic and gender subgroups; 2) among 18–21 year olds, cigarette initiation sharply increased through 2009, surpassing rates among 15–17 year olds, and sharply declined through 2015 while remaining higher than rates among the younger group, and this trend was consistent for almost all racial/ethnic subgroups; 3) daily initiation for those aged 18–21 significantly declined, and this was significant among most subgroups 4) there was no change in cigarette initiation and daily initiation for 22–25 year olds overall and most subgroups; 5) there was a significant increase in cigarette initiation for 22–25 year old Hispanics males and daily initiation for 22–25 year old males. This study provides a comprehensive look at trends in cigarette and daily initiation among U.S. youth and young adults. Despite notable declines in smoking initiation among youth and young adult populations over the last two decades, targeted prevention and policy efforts are needed for subgroups at higher risk, including young adults and Hispanic males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0200827
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

cigarettes
young adults
Tobacco Products
Young Adult
Hispanic Americans
national surveys
gender
nationalities and ethnic groups
cross-sectional studies
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Health
incidence
drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Patterns in first and daily cigarette initiation among youth and young adults from 2002 to 2015. / Cantrell, Jennifer; Bennett, Morgane; Mowery, Paul; Xiao, Haijun; Rath, Jessica; Hair, Elizabeth; Vallone, Donna.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 13, No. 8, e0200827, 01.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cantrell, Jennifer ; Bennett, Morgane ; Mowery, Paul ; Xiao, Haijun ; Rath, Jessica ; Hair, Elizabeth ; Vallone, Donna. / Patterns in first and daily cigarette initiation among youth and young adults from 2002 to 2015. In: PLoS One. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 8.
@article{eefb7d6b156943afb54ac15f8b5d95c7,
title = "Patterns in first and daily cigarette initiation among youth and young adults from 2002 to 2015",
abstract = "This study’s objective was to describe long-term trends and patterns in first cigarette use (cigarette initiation) and daily cigarette use (daily initiation) among youth and young adults in the U.S. We used cross-sectional survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002–2015, to estimate annual incidence of first cigarette use (N = 270,556) and first daily cigarette use (N = 373,464) for each year by age groups, race/ethnicity and gender, examining trends over time and the average annual change in initiation for each group. Several clear patterns emerged: 1) cigarette initiation and daily initiation significantly decreased over time among those aged 12–14 and 15–17 and these trends were consistent among nearly all racial/ethnic and gender subgroups; 2) among 18–21 year olds, cigarette initiation sharply increased through 2009, surpassing rates among 15–17 year olds, and sharply declined through 2015 while remaining higher than rates among the younger group, and this trend was consistent for almost all racial/ethnic subgroups; 3) daily initiation for those aged 18–21 significantly declined, and this was significant among most subgroups 4) there was no change in cigarette initiation and daily initiation for 22–25 year olds overall and most subgroups; 5) there was a significant increase in cigarette initiation for 22–25 year old Hispanics males and daily initiation for 22–25 year old males. This study provides a comprehensive look at trends in cigarette and daily initiation among U.S. youth and young adults. Despite notable declines in smoking initiation among youth and young adult populations over the last two decades, targeted prevention and policy efforts are needed for subgroups at higher risk, including young adults and Hispanic males.",
author = "Jennifer Cantrell and Morgane Bennett and Paul Mowery and Haijun Xiao and Jessica Rath and Elizabeth Hair and Donna Vallone",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0200827",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns in first and daily cigarette initiation among youth and young adults from 2002 to 2015

AU - Cantrell, Jennifer

AU - Bennett, Morgane

AU - Mowery, Paul

AU - Xiao, Haijun

AU - Rath, Jessica

AU - Hair, Elizabeth

AU - Vallone, Donna

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - This study’s objective was to describe long-term trends and patterns in first cigarette use (cigarette initiation) and daily cigarette use (daily initiation) among youth and young adults in the U.S. We used cross-sectional survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002–2015, to estimate annual incidence of first cigarette use (N = 270,556) and first daily cigarette use (N = 373,464) for each year by age groups, race/ethnicity and gender, examining trends over time and the average annual change in initiation for each group. Several clear patterns emerged: 1) cigarette initiation and daily initiation significantly decreased over time among those aged 12–14 and 15–17 and these trends were consistent among nearly all racial/ethnic and gender subgroups; 2) among 18–21 year olds, cigarette initiation sharply increased through 2009, surpassing rates among 15–17 year olds, and sharply declined through 2015 while remaining higher than rates among the younger group, and this trend was consistent for almost all racial/ethnic subgroups; 3) daily initiation for those aged 18–21 significantly declined, and this was significant among most subgroups 4) there was no change in cigarette initiation and daily initiation for 22–25 year olds overall and most subgroups; 5) there was a significant increase in cigarette initiation for 22–25 year old Hispanics males and daily initiation for 22–25 year old males. This study provides a comprehensive look at trends in cigarette and daily initiation among U.S. youth and young adults. Despite notable declines in smoking initiation among youth and young adult populations over the last two decades, targeted prevention and policy efforts are needed for subgroups at higher risk, including young adults and Hispanic males.

AB - This study’s objective was to describe long-term trends and patterns in first cigarette use (cigarette initiation) and daily cigarette use (daily initiation) among youth and young adults in the U.S. We used cross-sectional survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2002–2015, to estimate annual incidence of first cigarette use (N = 270,556) and first daily cigarette use (N = 373,464) for each year by age groups, race/ethnicity and gender, examining trends over time and the average annual change in initiation for each group. Several clear patterns emerged: 1) cigarette initiation and daily initiation significantly decreased over time among those aged 12–14 and 15–17 and these trends were consistent among nearly all racial/ethnic and gender subgroups; 2) among 18–21 year olds, cigarette initiation sharply increased through 2009, surpassing rates among 15–17 year olds, and sharply declined through 2015 while remaining higher than rates among the younger group, and this trend was consistent for almost all racial/ethnic subgroups; 3) daily initiation for those aged 18–21 significantly declined, and this was significant among most subgroups 4) there was no change in cigarette initiation and daily initiation for 22–25 year olds overall and most subgroups; 5) there was a significant increase in cigarette initiation for 22–25 year old Hispanics males and daily initiation for 22–25 year old males. This study provides a comprehensive look at trends in cigarette and daily initiation among U.S. youth and young adults. Despite notable declines in smoking initiation among youth and young adult populations over the last two decades, targeted prevention and policy efforts are needed for subgroups at higher risk, including young adults and Hispanic males.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052311642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85052311642&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0200827

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0200827

M3 - Article

C2 - 30096141

AN - SCOPUS:85052311642

VL - 13

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 8

M1 - e0200827

ER -