Patient-physician communication as organizational innovation in the managed care setting

Wendy Levinson, Thomas D'Aunno, Rita Gorawara-Bhat, Terry Stein, Sandra Reifsteck, Barry Egener, Rodney Dueck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite changes in the healthcare system, the relationship between patients and physicians remains fundamental to high-quality care. Managed care rules and restrictions, such as constraints on choice of providers, review processes, and decreasing length of visits, are creating potential conflicts between patients and their physicians. To strengthen the patient-physician relationship, some managed care organizations are implementing communication skills training for physicians. This article provides case studies describing how 2 large managed care organizations successfully incorporated communication skills training into their environments. An organizational perspective is used to delineate the 3 stages - adoption, implementation, and institutionalization - that managed care organizations generally traverse in incorporating communication skills programs and making them an integral part of their organizational culture. Specific suggestions are provided for physician leaders and administrators who are considering similar programs in their settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-630
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume8
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2002

Fingerprint

Organizational Innovation
Managed Care Programs
managed care
communication skills
Communication
physician
innovation
Physicians
Physician-Patient Relations
communication
Organizations
Organizational Culture
physician-patient relationship
Institutionalization
conflict potential
Quality of Health Care
organizational culture
Administrative Personnel
institutionalization
leader

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Levinson, W., D'Aunno, T., Gorawara-Bhat, R., Stein, T., Reifsteck, S., Egener, B., & Dueck, R. (2002). Patient-physician communication as organizational innovation in the managed care setting. American Journal of Managed Care, 8(7), 622-630.

Patient-physician communication as organizational innovation in the managed care setting. / Levinson, Wendy; D'Aunno, Thomas; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Stein, Terry; Reifsteck, Sandra; Egener, Barry; Dueck, Rodney.

In: American Journal of Managed Care, Vol. 8, No. 7, 07.2002, p. 622-630.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levinson, W, D'Aunno, T, Gorawara-Bhat, R, Stein, T, Reifsteck, S, Egener, B & Dueck, R 2002, 'Patient-physician communication as organizational innovation in the managed care setting', American Journal of Managed Care, vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 622-630.
Levinson W, D'Aunno T, Gorawara-Bhat R, Stein T, Reifsteck S, Egener B et al. Patient-physician communication as organizational innovation in the managed care setting. American Journal of Managed Care. 2002 Jul;8(7):622-630.
Levinson, Wendy ; D'Aunno, Thomas ; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita ; Stein, Terry ; Reifsteck, Sandra ; Egener, Barry ; Dueck, Rodney. / Patient-physician communication as organizational innovation in the managed care setting. In: American Journal of Managed Care. 2002 ; Vol. 8, No. 7. pp. 622-630.
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