Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia

M. J. Murphy, J. H. Graziano, D. Popovac, J. K. Kline, A. Mehmeti, P. Factor-Litvak, G. Ahmedi, Patrick Shrout, B. Rajovic, D. U. Nenezic, Z. A. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This analysis compares the rates of spontaneous abortion among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter with those of women living in a town where blood lead levels were low. Data derive from the obstetric histories of both groups of women obtained while seeking prenatal care for a later pregnancy. A total of 639 women (304 exposed, 335 unexposed) had at least one previous pregnancy and lived at the same address since their first pregnancy. The geometric mean blood lead concentrations in the sample at the time of the interviews were 0.77 μmol/L in the exposed town and 0.25 μmol/L in the unexposed town. The rates of spontaneous abortions in first pregnancies were similar, with 16.4 percent of women in the exposed town and 14.0 percent in the unexposed town reporting loss. The adjusted odds ratio relating town of residence to spontaneous abortion was 1.1 (95% CI = 0.9, 1.4). This analysis represents the first systematic attempt to seek an association between environmental lead exposure and spontaneous abortion. As such, the failure to find a positive association strongly suggests that at the levels of exposure represented in our sample, such an association does not exist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-35
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume80
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Kosovo
Yugoslavia
Pregnancy Outcome
Spontaneous Abortion
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Environmental Exposure
Obstetrics
Odds Ratio
Lead
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Murphy, M. J., Graziano, J. H., Popovac, D., Kline, J. K., Mehmeti, A., Factor-Litvak, P., ... Stein, Z. A. (1990). Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia. American Journal of Public Health, 80(1), 33-35.

Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia. / Murphy, M. J.; Graziano, J. H.; Popovac, D.; Kline, J. K.; Mehmeti, A.; Factor-Litvak, P.; Ahmedi, G.; Shrout, Patrick; Rajovic, B.; Nenezic, D. U.; Stein, Z. A.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 80, No. 1, 1990, p. 33-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphy, MJ, Graziano, JH, Popovac, D, Kline, JK, Mehmeti, A, Factor-Litvak, P, Ahmedi, G, Shrout, P, Rajovic, B, Nenezic, DU & Stein, ZA 1990, 'Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 80, no. 1, pp. 33-35.
Murphy MJ, Graziano JH, Popovac D, Kline JK, Mehmeti A, Factor-Litvak P et al. Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia. American Journal of Public Health. 1990;80(1):33-35.
Murphy, M. J. ; Graziano, J. H. ; Popovac, D. ; Kline, J. K. ; Mehmeti, A. ; Factor-Litvak, P. ; Ahmedi, G. ; Shrout, Patrick ; Rajovic, B. ; Nenezic, D. U. ; Stein, Z. A. / Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1990 ; Vol. 80, No. 1. pp. 33-35.
@article{eff71daab3ec425d8458f071ded7ff8c,
title = "Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia",
abstract = "This analysis compares the rates of spontaneous abortion among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter with those of women living in a town where blood lead levels were low. Data derive from the obstetric histories of both groups of women obtained while seeking prenatal care for a later pregnancy. A total of 639 women (304 exposed, 335 unexposed) had at least one previous pregnancy and lived at the same address since their first pregnancy. The geometric mean blood lead concentrations in the sample at the time of the interviews were 0.77 μmol/L in the exposed town and 0.25 μmol/L in the unexposed town. The rates of spontaneous abortions in first pregnancies were similar, with 16.4 percent of women in the exposed town and 14.0 percent in the unexposed town reporting loss. The adjusted odds ratio relating town of residence to spontaneous abortion was 1.1 (95{\%} CI = 0.9, 1.4). This analysis represents the first systematic attempt to seek an association between environmental lead exposure and spontaneous abortion. As such, the failure to find a positive association strongly suggests that at the levels of exposure represented in our sample, such an association does not exist.",
author = "Murphy, {M. J.} and Graziano, {J. H.} and D. Popovac and Kline, {J. K.} and A. Mehmeti and P. Factor-Litvak and G. Ahmedi and Patrick Shrout and B. Rajovic and Nenezic, {D. U.} and Stein, {Z. A.}",
year = "1990",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "80",
pages = "33--35",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Past pregnancy outcomes among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter in Kosovo, Yugoslavia

AU - Murphy, M. J.

AU - Graziano, J. H.

AU - Popovac, D.

AU - Kline, J. K.

AU - Mehmeti, A.

AU - Factor-Litvak, P.

AU - Ahmedi, G.

AU - Shrout, Patrick

AU - Rajovic, B.

AU - Nenezic, D. U.

AU - Stein, Z. A.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - This analysis compares the rates of spontaneous abortion among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter with those of women living in a town where blood lead levels were low. Data derive from the obstetric histories of both groups of women obtained while seeking prenatal care for a later pregnancy. A total of 639 women (304 exposed, 335 unexposed) had at least one previous pregnancy and lived at the same address since their first pregnancy. The geometric mean blood lead concentrations in the sample at the time of the interviews were 0.77 μmol/L in the exposed town and 0.25 μmol/L in the unexposed town. The rates of spontaneous abortions in first pregnancies were similar, with 16.4 percent of women in the exposed town and 14.0 percent in the unexposed town reporting loss. The adjusted odds ratio relating town of residence to spontaneous abortion was 1.1 (95% CI = 0.9, 1.4). This analysis represents the first systematic attempt to seek an association between environmental lead exposure and spontaneous abortion. As such, the failure to find a positive association strongly suggests that at the levels of exposure represented in our sample, such an association does not exist.

AB - This analysis compares the rates of spontaneous abortion among women living in the vicinity of a lead smelter with those of women living in a town where blood lead levels were low. Data derive from the obstetric histories of both groups of women obtained while seeking prenatal care for a later pregnancy. A total of 639 women (304 exposed, 335 unexposed) had at least one previous pregnancy and lived at the same address since their first pregnancy. The geometric mean blood lead concentrations in the sample at the time of the interviews were 0.77 μmol/L in the exposed town and 0.25 μmol/L in the unexposed town. The rates of spontaneous abortions in first pregnancies were similar, with 16.4 percent of women in the exposed town and 14.0 percent in the unexposed town reporting loss. The adjusted odds ratio relating town of residence to spontaneous abortion was 1.1 (95% CI = 0.9, 1.4). This analysis represents the first systematic attempt to seek an association between environmental lead exposure and spontaneous abortion. As such, the failure to find a positive association strongly suggests that at the levels of exposure represented in our sample, such an association does not exist.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20244378641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=20244378641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 80

SP - 33

EP - 35

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 1

ER -