Partnering with communities to improve health: The New York City Turning Point experience

E. R. Cagan, T. Hubinsky, A. Goodman, D. Deitcher, N. L. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Concurrent with the New York City Department of Health's reorganization efforts, the Robert Wood Johnson and W.K. Kellogg Foundations launched Turning Point, a national initiative designed to strengthen the nation's public health system. The Turning Point initiative has emphasized broad-based partnership building and planning as key prerequisites for improving public health practice. In response to the foundations' request for proposals, the department formed a New York City Public Health Partnership, which in turn applied for and was granted a Turning Point planning grant. This funding allowed New York City Turning Point to initiate a public health planning process, part of which involved convening forums in each of the five boroughs. With over 1,100 community participants, these forums provided both a starting point for establishing public health priorities and an interactive setting for sharing health and demographic data. Included among the issues that emerged as priorities were: access to care, environmental health, mental health, housing, asthma, education, and dietary issues. Building on the forum outcomes, the New York City Public Health Partnership developed a public health system improvement plan. The goals delineated in this plan are: (1) to create and support public health partnerships at the community, borough, and citywide levels; (2) to identify community health concerns and develop strategies responsive to these concerns; and (3) to develop policies to support and sustain a community health approach to improve health status. This article also discusses possible roles for local health departments in promoting a community health approach to address public health concerns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-180
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Public Health
public health
Health
health
community
experience
Health Systems Plans
Competitive Bidding
Public Health Practice
Health Priorities
Health Planning
Environmental Health
Organized Financing
health planning
planning
Health Status
reorganization
planning process
Mental Health
health status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Partnering with communities to improve health : The New York City Turning Point experience. / Cagan, E. R.; Hubinsky, T.; Goodman, A.; Deitcher, D.; Cohen, N. L.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 78, No. 1, 2001, p. 176-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cagan, E. R. ; Hubinsky, T. ; Goodman, A. ; Deitcher, D. ; Cohen, N. L. / Partnering with communities to improve health : The New York City Turning Point experience. In: Journal of Urban Health. 2001 ; Vol. 78, No. 1. pp. 176-180.
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