Participation in research involving novel sampling and study designs to identify acute HIV-1 infection among minority men who have sex with men.

Kristina Rodriguez, Delivette Castor, Timothy L. Mah, Stephanie H. Cook, Lex M. Auguiste, Perry N. Halkitis, Marty Markowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

HIV-1 infection disproportionally affects African-American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). Their inclusion in biomedical and behavioral research is critical to understanding and addressing HIV vulnerability. Using focus groups, we sought to understand the perceptions related to participating in biomedical research of acute/recent HIV-1 infection (AHI) using complex sampling and data collection methods to reach this hidden group at highest risk of acquiring and transmitting HIV. Given the potential impact of AHI on HIV transmission in MSM, it is important to understand this intersection for HIV prevention, care, and treatment purposes. The aim of this study was to understand how recruitment and data collection methods affect AHI research participation willingness particularly among MSM of color. Findings suggest that major barriers to research participation with complex sampling to identify AHI and intensive risk behavior collection such as diary methods are lack of anonymity, partner disclosure, and study fatigue. The authors explore implications for future study designs and development based on these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)828-834
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Sampling Studies
HIV Infections
HIV-1
data collection method
minority
participation
HIV
Research
behavioral research
anonymity
Biomedical Research
fatigue
risk behavior
vulnerability
Behavioral Research
Group
inclusion
Disclosure
Risk-Taking
Focus Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Participation in research involving novel sampling and study designs to identify acute HIV-1 infection among minority men who have sex with men. / Rodriguez, Kristina; Castor, Delivette; Mah, Timothy L.; Cook, Stephanie H.; Auguiste, Lex M.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Markowitz, Marty.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 25, No. 7, 2013, p. 828-834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodriguez, Kristina ; Castor, Delivette ; Mah, Timothy L. ; Cook, Stephanie H. ; Auguiste, Lex M. ; Halkitis, Perry N. ; Markowitz, Marty. / Participation in research involving novel sampling and study designs to identify acute HIV-1 infection among minority men who have sex with men. In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 7. pp. 828-834.
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