Participation in biomedical research studies and cancer screenings: Perceptions of risks to minorities compared with whites

Ralph Katz, Qi Wang Min, B. Lee Green, Nancy R. Kressin, Cristina Claudio, Stefanie Luise Russell, Christelle Sommervil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This analysis was conducted to determine whether there is a difference among blacks, Hispanics, and whites in their perception of risks associated with participating in either a biomedical study or a cancer screening. Methods: The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire, which focused on research subject participation, was administered in two different surveys (1999-2000 and 2003) in seven cities. The Cancer Screening Questionnaire was administered in 2003 in three cities. Results: The study sample across the three surveys consisted of 1,064 blacks, 781 Hispanics, and 1,598 non-Hispanic whites. Response rates ranged from 44% to 70% by city. Logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, education, income, and city, revealed that blacks and Hispanics each self-reported that minorities, compared with whites, are more likely to be "taken advantage of" in biomedical studies and much less likely to get a "thorough and careful examination" in a cancer screening (odds ratios ranged from 3.6 to 14.2). Conclusions: Blacks and Hispanics perceive equally high levels of risk for participating in cancer screening examinations and for volunteering to become research subjects in biomedical studies. This perception provides a strong message about the need to overtly address this critical health disparities issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-351
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Control
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2008

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Early Detection of Cancer
Hispanic Americans
Biomedical Research
Research Subjects
Sex Education
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Katz, R., Min, Q. W., Green, B. L., Kressin, N. R., Claudio, C., Russell, S. L., & Sommervil, C. (2008). Participation in biomedical research studies and cancer screenings: Perceptions of risks to minorities compared with whites. Cancer Control, 15(4), 344-351.

Participation in biomedical research studies and cancer screenings : Perceptions of risks to minorities compared with whites. / Katz, Ralph; Min, Qi Wang; Green, B. Lee; Kressin, Nancy R.; Claudio, Cristina; Russell, Stefanie Luise; Sommervil, Christelle.

In: Cancer Control, Vol. 15, No. 4, 10.2008, p. 344-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katz, R, Min, QW, Green, BL, Kressin, NR, Claudio, C, Russell, SL & Sommervil, C 2008, 'Participation in biomedical research studies and cancer screenings: Perceptions of risks to minorities compared with whites', Cancer Control, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 344-351.
Katz, Ralph ; Min, Qi Wang ; Green, B. Lee ; Kressin, Nancy R. ; Claudio, Cristina ; Russell, Stefanie Luise ; Sommervil, Christelle. / Participation in biomedical research studies and cancer screenings : Perceptions of risks to minorities compared with whites. In: Cancer Control. 2008 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 344-351.
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