Parsing the prosencephalon

Murielle Rallu, Joshua G. Corbin, Gordon Fishell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The forebrain, or prosencephalon, consists of the diencephalon and the telencephalon. The diencephalon is the conduit for ascending sensory information, whereas the telencephalon is the highest-order processor of neural function, and is consequently the most complex region of the nervous system. In this review, we discuss how fate restrictions, starting from the induction of neural character, result in the sequential specification of anterior neural tissue, forebrain and telencephalon, and finally dorsoventral patterning. Rather than relying on novel signalling pathways, the complexity of the mature brain seems to result from the unique ordering of signals used widely during development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)943-951
Number of pages9
JournalNature Reviews Neuroscience
Volume3
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Telencephalon
Prosencephalon
Diencephalon
Nervous System
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Parsing the prosencephalon. / Rallu, Murielle; Corbin, Joshua G.; Fishell, Gordon.

In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Vol. 3, No. 12, 01.01.2002, p. 943-951.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rallu, Murielle ; Corbin, Joshua G. ; Fishell, Gordon. / Parsing the prosencephalon. In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience. 2002 ; Vol. 3, No. 12. pp. 943-951.
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