Parenting and globalization in western countries: explaining differences in parent–child interactions

Mariëlle JL Prevoo, Catherine Tamis-Lemonda

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

We review research on intra-cultural differences in parenting, and the sources of those differences. Ethnic-minority parents differ from majority parents in parenting values, childrearing goals and resources—differences that affect parenting practices and children's development. Within-country comparisons indicate less sensitivity, more authoritarian discipline, less child-focused communications, and less engagement in learning activities in ethnic-minority compared to ethnic-majority parents, which help account for disparities in children. Despite group differences in parenting, associations between parenting and child development generalize across cultures, with rare exceptions. However, a focus on intra-cultural differences is based on comparisons of group ‘averages’, which masks the enormous variation within ethnic-minority samples. Within-group variation can be partly explained by stressors associated with low socioeconomic status (SES), acculturation and discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-39
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Internationality
Parenting
Parents
Child Development
Acculturation
Masks
Social Class
Communication
Learning
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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Parenting and globalization in western countries : explaining differences in parent–child interactions. / Prevoo, Mariëlle JL; Tamis-Lemonda, Catherine.

In: Current Opinion in Psychology, Vol. 15, 01.06.2017, p. 33-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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