Parenting and Cortisol in Infancy Interactively Predict Conduct Problems and Callous–Unemotional Behaviors in Childhood

Family Life Project Key Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines observed maternal sensitivity, harsh-intrusion, and mental-state talk in infancy as predictors of conduct problems (CP) and callous–unemotional (CU) behaviors in middle childhood, as well as the extent to which infants’ resting cortisol and cortisol reactivity moderate these associations. Using data from the Family Life Project (n = 1,292), results indicate that maternal sensitivity at 6 months predicts fewer CP at first grade, but only for infants who demonstrate high levels of cortisol reactivity. Maternal harsh intrusion predicts fewer empathic–prosocial behaviors, a component of CU behaviors, but only for infants who demonstrate high resting cortisol. Findings are discussed in the context of diathesis–stress and differential susceptibility models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-297
Number of pages19
JournalChild Development
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Parenting
Hydrocortisone
infant
childhood
Mothers
Infant Behavior
school grade

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Parenting and Cortisol in Infancy Interactively Predict Conduct Problems and Callous–Unemotional Behaviors in Childhood. / Family Life Project Key Investigators.

In: Child Development, Vol. 90, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 279-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d36db650c0004bceb518f107e8126180,
title = "Parenting and Cortisol in Infancy Interactively Predict Conduct Problems and Callous–Unemotional Behaviors in Childhood",
abstract = "This study examines observed maternal sensitivity, harsh-intrusion, and mental-state talk in infancy as predictors of conduct problems (CP) and callous–unemotional (CU) behaviors in middle childhood, as well as the extent to which infants’ resting cortisol and cortisol reactivity moderate these associations. Using data from the Family Life Project (n = 1,292), results indicate that maternal sensitivity at 6 months predicts fewer CP at first grade, but only for infants who demonstrate high levels of cortisol reactivity. Maternal harsh intrusion predicts fewer empathic–prosocial behaviors, a component of CU behaviors, but only for infants who demonstrate high resting cortisol. Findings are discussed in the context of diathesis–stress and differential susceptibility models.",
author = "{Family Life Project Key Investigators} and Wagner, {Nicholas J.} and Mills-Koonce, {W. Roger} and Willoughby, {Michael T.} and Cox, {Martha J.} and Lynne Vernon-Feagans and Clancy Blair and Burchinal, {Margaret R.} and Keith Crnic and Ann Crouter and Patricia Garrett-Peters and Greenberg, {Mark T.} and Frank, {Jennifer L.} and Cynthia Stifter and Emily Werner and Stephanie Lanza",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/cdev.12900",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
pages = "279--297",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parenting and Cortisol in Infancy Interactively Predict Conduct Problems and Callous–Unemotional Behaviors in Childhood

AU - Family Life Project Key Investigators

AU - Wagner, Nicholas J.

AU - Mills-Koonce, W. Roger

AU - Willoughby, Michael T.

AU - Cox, Martha J.

AU - Vernon-Feagans, Lynne

AU - Blair, Clancy

AU - Burchinal, Margaret R.

AU - Crnic, Keith

AU - Crouter, Ann

AU - Garrett-Peters, Patricia

AU - Greenberg, Mark T.

AU - Frank, Jennifer L.

AU - Stifter, Cynthia

AU - Werner, Emily

AU - Lanza, Stephanie

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - This study examines observed maternal sensitivity, harsh-intrusion, and mental-state talk in infancy as predictors of conduct problems (CP) and callous–unemotional (CU) behaviors in middle childhood, as well as the extent to which infants’ resting cortisol and cortisol reactivity moderate these associations. Using data from the Family Life Project (n = 1,292), results indicate that maternal sensitivity at 6 months predicts fewer CP at first grade, but only for infants who demonstrate high levels of cortisol reactivity. Maternal harsh intrusion predicts fewer empathic–prosocial behaviors, a component of CU behaviors, but only for infants who demonstrate high resting cortisol. Findings are discussed in the context of diathesis–stress and differential susceptibility models.

AB - This study examines observed maternal sensitivity, harsh-intrusion, and mental-state talk in infancy as predictors of conduct problems (CP) and callous–unemotional (CU) behaviors in middle childhood, as well as the extent to which infants’ resting cortisol and cortisol reactivity moderate these associations. Using data from the Family Life Project (n = 1,292), results indicate that maternal sensitivity at 6 months predicts fewer CP at first grade, but only for infants who demonstrate high levels of cortisol reactivity. Maternal harsh intrusion predicts fewer empathic–prosocial behaviors, a component of CU behaviors, but only for infants who demonstrate high resting cortisol. Findings are discussed in the context of diathesis–stress and differential susceptibility models.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059828906&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85059828906&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/cdev.12900

DO - 10.1111/cdev.12900

M3 - Article

VL - 90

SP - 279

EP - 297

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 1

ER -