Parent-Adolescent Communication About Sexual Intercourse: An Analysis of Maternal Reluctance to Communicate

Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, James Jaccard, Patricia Dittus, Sarah Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: A unified theory of behavior was applied to parent-adolescent communication about sexual intercourse to understand why some mothers speak less often with their children about not having sexual intercourse. According to the theory, parental decisions or intentions to engage in such conversations are a function of expectancies, social norms, self-concept, emotions, and self-efficacy. Design: Data were collected from a random sample of 668 mother-adolescent dyads recruited from middle schools located in the Bronx community of New York City. Data were collected via self-administered surveys. Main Outcome Measures: Mother and adolescent reports on the frequency of parent-adolescent communication about sexual intercourse were obtained. Adolescents and mothers reported how often the mother had discussed 21 topics related to sexual behavior. Results and Conclusion: Results supported the utility of the framework for understanding parent-adolescent communication about sexual intercourse. Significant maternal correlates included (a) expectancies about lacking knowledge, being embarrassed and encouraging children to think maturely and focus on school; (b) self-concept and perceiving that mothers who didn't talk with their children about sex were irresponsible; (c) emotions about feeling relaxed and comfortable; and (d) self-efficacy about the ease of talking with one's child. Implications for family based prevention programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)760-769
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

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Coitus
Communication
Mothers
Emotions
Self Efficacy
Self Concept
Decision Theory
Sexual Behavior
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • adolescent pregnancy prevention
  • adolescent sexual risk behavior
  • adolescent sexual risk reduction
  • parent-adolescent communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Parent-Adolescent Communication About Sexual Intercourse : An Analysis of Maternal Reluctance to Communicate. / Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Jaccard, James; Dittus, Patricia; Collins, Sarah.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 27, No. 6, 11.2008, p. 760-769.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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