Paleogenetic analyses reveal unsuspected phylogenetic affinities between mice and the extinct Malpaisomys insularis, an endemic rodent of the Canaries

Marie Pagès, Pascale Chevret, Muriel Gros-Balthazard, Sandrine Hughes, Josep Antoni Alcover, Rainer Hutterer, Juan Carlos Rando, Jacques Michaux, Catherine Hänni

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background: The lava mouse, Malpaisomys insularis, was endemic to the Eastern Canary islands and became extinct at the beginning of the 14 th century when the Europeans reached the archipelago. Studies to determine Malpaisomys' phylogenetic affinities, based on morphological characters, remained inconclusive because morphological changes experienced by this insular rodent make phylogenetic investigations a real challenge. Over 20 years since its first description, Malpaisomys' phylogenetic position remains enigmatic. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study, we resolved this issue using molecular characters. Mitochondrial and nuclear markers were successfully amplified from subfossils of three lava mouse samples. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions revealed, without any ambiguity, unsuspected relationships between Malpaisomys and extant mice (genus Mus, Murinae). Moreover, through molecular dating we estimated the origin of the Malpaisomys/mouse clade at 6.9 Ma, corresponding to the maximal age at which the archipelago was colonised by the Malpaisomys ancestor via natural rafting. Conclusion/Significance: This study reconsiders the derived morphological characters of Malpaisomys in light of this unexpected molecular finding. To reconcile molecular and morphological data, we propose to consider Malpaisomys insularis as an insular lineage of mouse.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numbere31123
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume7
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 21 2012

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    Canaries
    canaries
    Rodentia
    rodents
    lava
    phylogeny
    mice
    Murinae
    Mus
    Canary Islands
    ancestry
    Spain

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Paleogenetic analyses reveal unsuspected phylogenetic affinities between mice and the extinct Malpaisomys insularis, an endemic rodent of the Canaries. / Pagès, Marie; Chevret, Pascale; Gros-Balthazard, Muriel; Hughes, Sandrine; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Hutterer, Rainer; Rando, Juan Carlos; Michaux, Jacques; Hänni, Catherine.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 2, e31123, 21.02.2012.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Pagès, M, Chevret, P, Gros-Balthazard, M, Hughes, S, Alcover, JA, Hutterer, R, Rando, JC, Michaux, J & Hänni, C 2012, 'Paleogenetic analyses reveal unsuspected phylogenetic affinities between mice and the extinct Malpaisomys insularis, an endemic rodent of the Canaries', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 2, e31123. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0031123
    Pagès, Marie ; Chevret, Pascale ; Gros-Balthazard, Muriel ; Hughes, Sandrine ; Alcover, Josep Antoni ; Hutterer, Rainer ; Rando, Juan Carlos ; Michaux, Jacques ; Hänni, Catherine. / Paleogenetic analyses reveal unsuspected phylogenetic affinities between mice and the extinct Malpaisomys insularis, an endemic rodent of the Canaries. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 2.
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