Pad: An alternative approach to the computer interface

Kenneth Perlin, David Fox

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We believe that navigation in information spaces is best supported by tapping into our natural spatial and geographic ways of thinking. To this end, we are developing a new computer interface model called Pad. The ongoing Pad project uses a spatial metaphor for computer interface design. It provides an intuitive base for the support of such applications as electronic marketplaces, information services, and on-line collaboration. Pad is an infinite two dimensional information plane that is shared among users, much as a network file system is shared. Objects are organized geographically; every object occupies a well defined region on the Pad surface. For navigation, Pad uses "portals" magnifying glasses that can peer into and roam over different parts of this single infinite shared desktop; links to specific items are established and broken continually as the portal's view changes. Portals can recursively look onto other portals. This paradigm enables the sort of peripheral activity generally found in real physical working environments. The apparent size of an object to any user determines the amount of detail it presents. Different users can share and view multiple applications while assigning each a desired degree of interaction. Documents can be visually nested and zoomed as they move back and forth between primary and secondary working attention. Things can be peripherally accessible. In this paper we describe the Pad interface. We discuss how to efficiently implement its graphical aspects, and we illustrate some of our initial applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages57-64
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)0897916018, 9780897916011
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1993
Event20th International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993 - Anaheim, United States
Duration: Aug 2 1993Aug 6 1993

Other

Other20th International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim
Period8/2/938/6/93

Fingerprint

Interfaces (computer)
Navigation
Information services
Glass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

Perlin, K., & Fox, D. (1993). Pad: An alternative approach to the computer interface. In Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993 (pp. 57-64). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/166117.166125

Pad : An alternative approach to the computer interface. / Perlin, Kenneth; Fox, David.

Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 1993. p. 57-64.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Perlin, K & Fox, D 1993, Pad: An alternative approach to the computer interface. in Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 57-64, 20th International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993, Anaheim, United States, 8/2/93. https://doi.org/10.1145/166117.166125
Perlin K, Fox D. Pad: An alternative approach to the computer interface. In Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 1993. p. 57-64 https://doi.org/10.1145/166117.166125
Perlin, Kenneth ; Fox, David. / Pad : An alternative approach to the computer interface. Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, SIGGRAPH 1993. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 1993. pp. 57-64
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