Overweight and obesity among Ghanaian residents in the Netherlands

How do they weigh against their urban and rural counterparts in Ghana?

Charles Agyemang, Ellis Owusu-Dabo, Ank De Jonge, David Martins, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Karien Stronks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate differences in overweight and obesity between first-generation Dutch-Ghanaian migrants in The Netherlands and their rural and urban counterparts in Ghana. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A total of 1471 Ghanaians (rural Ghanaians, n 532; urban Ghanaians, n 787; Dutch-Ghanaians, n 152) aged ≥17 years. Main outcome measures: Overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). Results: Dutch-Ghanaians had a significantly higher prevalence of overweight and obesity (men 69.1 %, women 79.5 %) than urban Ghanaians (men 22.0 %, women 50.0 %) and rural Ghanaians (men 10.3 %, women 19.0 %). Urban Ghanaian men and women also had a significantly higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than their rural Ghanaian counterparts. In a logistic regression analysis adjusting for age and education, the odds ratios for being overweight or obese were 3.10 (95 % CI 1.75, 5.48) for urban Ghanaian men and 19.06 (95 % CI 8.98, 40.43) for Dutch-Ghanaian men compared with rural Ghanaian men. Among women, the odds ratios for being overweight and obese were 3.84 (95 % CI 2.66, 5.53) for urban Ghanaians and 11.4 (95 % CI 5.97, 22.07) for Dutch-Ghanaians compared with their rural Ghanaian counterparts. Conclusion: Our current findings give credence to earlier reports of an increase in the prevalence of overweight/obesity with urbanization within Africa and migration to industrialized countries. These findings indicate an urgent need to further assess migration-related factors that lead to these increases in overweight and obesity among migrants with non-Western background, and their impact on overweight- and obesity-related illnesses such as diabetes among these populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)909-916
Number of pages8
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Ghana
Netherlands
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Urbanization
Developed Countries
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education

Keywords

  • Ethnic minority groups
  • Ghana
  • Migration
  • Overweight/obesity
  • The Netherlands

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Overweight and obesity among Ghanaian residents in the Netherlands : How do they weigh against their urban and rural counterparts in Ghana? / Agyemang, Charles; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; De Jonge, Ank; Martins, David; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Stronks, Karien.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 12, No. 7, 07.2009, p. 909-916.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agyemang, Charles ; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis ; De Jonge, Ank ; Martins, David ; Ogedegbe, Gbenga ; Stronks, Karien. / Overweight and obesity among Ghanaian residents in the Netherlands : How do they weigh against their urban and rural counterparts in Ghana?. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2009 ; Vol. 12, No. 7. pp. 909-916.
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AB - Objective: To investigate differences in overweight and obesity between first-generation Dutch-Ghanaian migrants in The Netherlands and their rural and urban counterparts in Ghana. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A total of 1471 Ghanaians (rural Ghanaians, n 532; urban Ghanaians, n 787; Dutch-Ghanaians, n 152) aged ≥17 years. Main outcome measures: Overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). Results: Dutch-Ghanaians had a significantly higher prevalence of overweight and obesity (men 69.1 %, women 79.5 %) than urban Ghanaians (men 22.0 %, women 50.0 %) and rural Ghanaians (men 10.3 %, women 19.0 %). Urban Ghanaian men and women also had a significantly higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than their rural Ghanaian counterparts. In a logistic regression analysis adjusting for age and education, the odds ratios for being overweight or obese were 3.10 (95 % CI 1.75, 5.48) for urban Ghanaian men and 19.06 (95 % CI 8.98, 40.43) for Dutch-Ghanaian men compared with rural Ghanaian men. Among women, the odds ratios for being overweight and obese were 3.84 (95 % CI 2.66, 5.53) for urban Ghanaians and 11.4 (95 % CI 5.97, 22.07) for Dutch-Ghanaians compared with their rural Ghanaian counterparts. Conclusion: Our current findings give credence to earlier reports of an increase in the prevalence of overweight/obesity with urbanization within Africa and migration to industrialized countries. These findings indicate an urgent need to further assess migration-related factors that lead to these increases in overweight and obesity among migrants with non-Western background, and their impact on overweight- and obesity-related illnesses such as diabetes among these populations.

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