Oral Health Symptoms and Cognitive Function Among US Community‐Dwelling Chinese Older Adults

Darina V. Petrovsky, Bei Wu, Weiyu Mao, Xinqi Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES
Limited research is available on the relationship between oral health symptoms and cognitive function among community‐dwelling US Chinese older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between tooth/gum symptoms and changes in cognitive function.

DESIGN
Two‐wave epidemiological study.

SETTING
Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE).

PARTICIPANTS
US Chinese older adults (N = 2713; mean age = 72.6 y; 58.4% women).

MEASUREMENTS
We selected self‐reported oral (tooth and gum) symptoms as independent variables. To examine changes in cognitive function (wave 2: Baseline), we chose the following three domains: episodic memory (East Boston Memory Test); executive function (Symbol Digit Modalities Test); and working memory (Digit Span Backwards). In addition, we assessed global cognitive function by constructing a composite measure.

RESULTS
At baseline, 1297 participants (47.8%) reported having teeth symptoms, and 513 participants (18.9%) reported having gum symptoms. Adjusting for sociodemographic and health‐related characteristics, participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced their global cognition decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .003) and their episodic memory decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .026). Participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced a faster rate of decline in global cognition for every additional year (estimate = 0.02; p = .047). However, this effect disappeared once we adjusted for all covariates (estimate = 0.02; p = .069). We found no significant relationship between baseline gum symptoms and change of cognitive function.

CONCLUSION
Having teeth symptoms was associated with a decline in cognitive function among US Chinese older adults. Developing policy measures aimed at ameliorating health and improving cognition in this high‐risk fast‐growing population in the United States would need to include oral health preventive and dental care services. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:S532–S537, 2019.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S532-S537
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

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Oral Health
Cognition
Tooth
Gingiva
Episodic Memory
Preventive Medicine
Dental Care
Executive Function
Short-Term Memory
Epidemiologic Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Health

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Oral Health Symptoms and Cognitive Function Among US Community‐Dwelling Chinese Older Adults. / Petrovsky, Darina V.; Wu, Bei; Mao, Weiyu; Dong, Xinqi.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2019, p. S532-S537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Oral Health Symptoms and Cognitive Function Among US Community‐Dwelling Chinese Older Adults",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVESLimited research is available on the relationship between oral health symptoms and cognitive function among community‐dwelling US Chinese older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between tooth/gum symptoms and changes in cognitive function.DESIGNTwo‐wave epidemiological study.SETTINGPopulation Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE).PARTICIPANTSUS Chinese older adults (N = 2713; mean age = 72.6 y; 58.4{\%} women).MEASUREMENTSWe selected self‐reported oral (tooth and gum) symptoms as independent variables. To examine changes in cognitive function (wave 2: Baseline), we chose the following three domains: episodic memory (East Boston Memory Test); executive function (Symbol Digit Modalities Test); and working memory (Digit Span Backwards). In addition, we assessed global cognitive function by constructing a composite measure.RESULTSAt baseline, 1297 participants (47.8{\%}) reported having teeth symptoms, and 513 participants (18.9{\%}) reported having gum symptoms. Adjusting for sociodemographic and health‐related characteristics, participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced their global cognition decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .003) and their episodic memory decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .026). Participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced a faster rate of decline in global cognition for every additional year (estimate = 0.02; p = .047). However, this effect disappeared once we adjusted for all covariates (estimate = 0.02; p = .069). We found no significant relationship between baseline gum symptoms and change of cognitive function.CONCLUSIONHaving teeth symptoms was associated with a decline in cognitive function among US Chinese older adults. Developing policy measures aimed at ameliorating health and improving cognition in this high‐risk fast‐growing population in the United States would need to include oral health preventive and dental care services. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:S532–S537, 2019.",
author = "Petrovsky, {Darina V.} and Bei Wu and Weiyu Mao and Xinqi Dong",
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AU - Mao, Weiyu

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N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVESLimited research is available on the relationship between oral health symptoms and cognitive function among community‐dwelling US Chinese older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between tooth/gum symptoms and changes in cognitive function.DESIGNTwo‐wave epidemiological study.SETTINGPopulation Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE).PARTICIPANTSUS Chinese older adults (N = 2713; mean age = 72.6 y; 58.4% women).MEASUREMENTSWe selected self‐reported oral (tooth and gum) symptoms as independent variables. To examine changes in cognitive function (wave 2: Baseline), we chose the following three domains: episodic memory (East Boston Memory Test); executive function (Symbol Digit Modalities Test); and working memory (Digit Span Backwards). In addition, we assessed global cognitive function by constructing a composite measure.RESULTSAt baseline, 1297 participants (47.8%) reported having teeth symptoms, and 513 participants (18.9%) reported having gum symptoms. Adjusting for sociodemographic and health‐related characteristics, participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced their global cognition decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .003) and their episodic memory decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .026). Participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced a faster rate of decline in global cognition for every additional year (estimate = 0.02; p = .047). However, this effect disappeared once we adjusted for all covariates (estimate = 0.02; p = .069). We found no significant relationship between baseline gum symptoms and change of cognitive function.CONCLUSIONHaving teeth symptoms was associated with a decline in cognitive function among US Chinese older adults. Developing policy measures aimed at ameliorating health and improving cognition in this high‐risk fast‐growing population in the United States would need to include oral health preventive and dental care services. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:S532–S537, 2019.

AB - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVESLimited research is available on the relationship between oral health symptoms and cognitive function among community‐dwelling US Chinese older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between tooth/gum symptoms and changes in cognitive function.DESIGNTwo‐wave epidemiological study.SETTINGPopulation Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE).PARTICIPANTSUS Chinese older adults (N = 2713; mean age = 72.6 y; 58.4% women).MEASUREMENTSWe selected self‐reported oral (tooth and gum) symptoms as independent variables. To examine changes in cognitive function (wave 2: Baseline), we chose the following three domains: episodic memory (East Boston Memory Test); executive function (Symbol Digit Modalities Test); and working memory (Digit Span Backwards). In addition, we assessed global cognitive function by constructing a composite measure.RESULTSAt baseline, 1297 participants (47.8%) reported having teeth symptoms, and 513 participants (18.9%) reported having gum symptoms. Adjusting for sociodemographic and health‐related characteristics, participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced their global cognition decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .003) and their episodic memory decrease by 0.07 units (estimate = −0.07; p = .026). Participants who reported having teeth symptoms at baseline experienced a faster rate of decline in global cognition for every additional year (estimate = 0.02; p = .047). However, this effect disappeared once we adjusted for all covariates (estimate = 0.02; p = .069). We found no significant relationship between baseline gum symptoms and change of cognitive function.CONCLUSIONHaving teeth symptoms was associated with a decline in cognitive function among US Chinese older adults. Developing policy measures aimed at ameliorating health and improving cognition in this high‐risk fast‐growing population in the United States would need to include oral health preventive and dental care services. J Am Geriatr Soc 67:S532–S537, 2019.

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JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

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