Oral health-related quality of life in youth receiving cleft-related surgery: self-report and proxy ratings

Hillary Broder, Maureen Wilson-Genderson, Lacey Sischo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This paper evaluated the impact of cleft-related surgery on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of youth with cleft over time. Methods: Data were derived from a 5-year, multi-center, prospective, longitudinal study of 1196 youth with cleft lip and/or palate and their caregivers. Eligible youth were between 7.5 and 18.5 years old, spoke English or Spanish, and were non-syndromic. During each observational period, which included baseline, and 1- and 2-year post-baseline follow-up visits, youths and their caregivers completed the Child Oral Health Impact Profile, a validated measure of OHRQoL. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to analyze the effects of receipt of craniofacial surgery on OHRQoL over time. Results: During the course of this study a total of 516 patients (43 %) received at least one surgery. Youth in the surgery recommendation group had lower self- (β = −2.18, p < 0.05) and proxy-rated (β = −2.92, p < 0.02) OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical self- and proxy-rated OHRQoL at baseline. Both surgical and non-surgical youth (β = 3.73, p < 0.001) and caregiver (β = 1.91, p < 0.05) ratings of OHRQoL improved over time. There was significant incremental improvement (time × surgery interaction) in self-reported OHRQoL for youth postsurgery (β = 1.04, p < 0.05), but this postsurgery increment was not seen in the caregiver proxy ratings. Conclusions: Surgical intervention impacts OHRQoL among youth with cleft. Youth who were surgical candidates had lower baseline self- and caregiver-rated OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical youth. Youth who underwent cleft-related surgery had significant incremental improvements in self-rated but not caregiver (proxy)-rated OHRQoL after surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalQuality of Life Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 3 2016

Fingerprint

Oral Health
Proxy
Self Report
Quality of Life
Caregivers
Cleft Lip
Cleft Palate
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Caregiver (proxy) ratings
  • Cleft lip/palate
  • Longitudinal
  • Oral health-related quality of life
  • Patient-reported outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Oral health-related quality of life in youth receiving cleft-related surgery : self-report and proxy ratings. / Broder, Hillary; Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Sischo, Lacey.

In: Quality of Life Research, 03.10.2016, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{87284162b703429c878235e4132a6d58,
title = "Oral health-related quality of life in youth receiving cleft-related surgery: self-report and proxy ratings",
abstract = "Purpose: This paper evaluated the impact of cleft-related surgery on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of youth with cleft over time. Methods: Data were derived from a 5-year, multi-center, prospective, longitudinal study of 1196 youth with cleft lip and/or palate and their caregivers. Eligible youth were between 7.5 and 18.5 years old, spoke English or Spanish, and were non-syndromic. During each observational period, which included baseline, and 1- and 2-year post-baseline follow-up visits, youths and their caregivers completed the Child Oral Health Impact Profile, a validated measure of OHRQoL. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to analyze the effects of receipt of craniofacial surgery on OHRQoL over time. Results: During the course of this study a total of 516 patients (43 {\%}) received at least one surgery. Youth in the surgery recommendation group had lower self- (β = −2.18, p < 0.05) and proxy-rated (β = −2.92, p < 0.02) OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical self- and proxy-rated OHRQoL at baseline. Both surgical and non-surgical youth (β = 3.73, p < 0.001) and caregiver (β = 1.91, p < 0.05) ratings of OHRQoL improved over time. There was significant incremental improvement (time × surgery interaction) in self-reported OHRQoL for youth postsurgery (β = 1.04, p < 0.05), but this postsurgery increment was not seen in the caregiver proxy ratings. Conclusions: Surgical intervention impacts OHRQoL among youth with cleft. Youth who were surgical candidates had lower baseline self- and caregiver-rated OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical youth. Youth who underwent cleft-related surgery had significant incremental improvements in self-rated but not caregiver (proxy)-rated OHRQoL after surgery.",
keywords = "Caregiver (proxy) ratings, Cleft lip/palate, Longitudinal, Oral health-related quality of life, Patient-reported outcomes",
author = "Hillary Broder and Maureen Wilson-Genderson and Lacey Sischo",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1007/s11136-016-1420-5",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--9",
journal = "Quality of Life Research",
issn = "0962-9343",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral health-related quality of life in youth receiving cleft-related surgery

T2 - self-report and proxy ratings

AU - Broder, Hillary

AU - Wilson-Genderson, Maureen

AU - Sischo, Lacey

PY - 2016/10/3

Y1 - 2016/10/3

N2 - Purpose: This paper evaluated the impact of cleft-related surgery on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of youth with cleft over time. Methods: Data were derived from a 5-year, multi-center, prospective, longitudinal study of 1196 youth with cleft lip and/or palate and their caregivers. Eligible youth were between 7.5 and 18.5 years old, spoke English or Spanish, and were non-syndromic. During each observational period, which included baseline, and 1- and 2-year post-baseline follow-up visits, youths and their caregivers completed the Child Oral Health Impact Profile, a validated measure of OHRQoL. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to analyze the effects of receipt of craniofacial surgery on OHRQoL over time. Results: During the course of this study a total of 516 patients (43 %) received at least one surgery. Youth in the surgery recommendation group had lower self- (β = −2.18, p < 0.05) and proxy-rated (β = −2.92, p < 0.02) OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical self- and proxy-rated OHRQoL at baseline. Both surgical and non-surgical youth (β = 3.73, p < 0.001) and caregiver (β = 1.91, p < 0.05) ratings of OHRQoL improved over time. There was significant incremental improvement (time × surgery interaction) in self-reported OHRQoL for youth postsurgery (β = 1.04, p < 0.05), but this postsurgery increment was not seen in the caregiver proxy ratings. Conclusions: Surgical intervention impacts OHRQoL among youth with cleft. Youth who were surgical candidates had lower baseline self- and caregiver-rated OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical youth. Youth who underwent cleft-related surgery had significant incremental improvements in self-rated but not caregiver (proxy)-rated OHRQoL after surgery.

AB - Purpose: This paper evaluated the impact of cleft-related surgery on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of youth with cleft over time. Methods: Data were derived from a 5-year, multi-center, prospective, longitudinal study of 1196 youth with cleft lip and/or palate and their caregivers. Eligible youth were between 7.5 and 18.5 years old, spoke English or Spanish, and were non-syndromic. During each observational period, which included baseline, and 1- and 2-year post-baseline follow-up visits, youths and their caregivers completed the Child Oral Health Impact Profile, a validated measure of OHRQoL. Multilevel mixed-effects models were used to analyze the effects of receipt of craniofacial surgery on OHRQoL over time. Results: During the course of this study a total of 516 patients (43 %) received at least one surgery. Youth in the surgery recommendation group had lower self- (β = −2.18, p < 0.05) and proxy-rated (β = −2.92, p < 0.02) OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical self- and proxy-rated OHRQoL at baseline. Both surgical and non-surgical youth (β = 3.73, p < 0.001) and caregiver (β = 1.91, p < 0.05) ratings of OHRQoL improved over time. There was significant incremental improvement (time × surgery interaction) in self-reported OHRQoL for youth postsurgery (β = 1.04, p < 0.05), but this postsurgery increment was not seen in the caregiver proxy ratings. Conclusions: Surgical intervention impacts OHRQoL among youth with cleft. Youth who were surgical candidates had lower baseline self- and caregiver-rated OHRQoL when compared to non-surgical youth. Youth who underwent cleft-related surgery had significant incremental improvements in self-rated but not caregiver (proxy)-rated OHRQoL after surgery.

KW - Caregiver (proxy) ratings

KW - Cleft lip/palate

KW - Longitudinal

KW - Oral health-related quality of life

KW - Patient-reported outcomes

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989946999&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84989946999&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11136-016-1420-5

DO - 10.1007/s11136-016-1420-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 27699557

AN - SCOPUS:84989946999

SP - 1

EP - 9

JO - Quality of Life Research

JF - Quality of Life Research

SN - 0962-9343

ER -