Oral health perceptions and adherence with dental treatment referrals among caregivers of children with HIV

Hillary Broder, Stefanie L. Russell, Evelyn Varagiannis, Susan T. Reisine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Results from a 3-year longitudinal study on the oral manifestations of AIDS (OMA) among seropositive children and their siblings indicated poor adherence with recommendations for dental treatment (Broder, Catalanotto, Reisine, and Variagiannis, 1996). The purposes of this study were to (a) to examine oral health behaviors, attitudes, and perceived barriers to care among caregivers of children with HIV and their siblings who were referred for dental care, and (b) develop and evaluate a 5-week summer pilot program to increase adherence with referral for dental treatment. Telephone interviews with caregivers were conducted to identify barriers to care and to implement services to increase attendance in the dental clinic for their children. Interviews were completed with 28 of the 38 (74%) caregivers recruited from the OMA study (previously cited) who had children referred for dental treatment at the final (sixth) oral health research exam. Twelve of their 58 children (21%) had obtained dental care privately, 25 (62.5%) initiated treatment and 2 (6.3%) completed treatment at the referred dental school during the 5-week pilot program. Although caregivers of children with HIV and their siblings were responsive to the initial efforts of the program's service coordinators, follow-up data from the coordinators' records and chart abstraction revealed that the majority of the participants did not appear for their second or third appointments. The interview reports suggested that caregivers expect dental treatment, such as restorations, at each appointment and do not regard exams/treatment planning as treatment. Personal/family and health care delivery system factors were expressed barriers to dental care. Implications for future programs and investigations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-551
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume11
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1999

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dental treatment
Oral Health
Caregivers
caregiver
Tooth
Referral and Consultation
HIV
health
Dental Care
Oral Manifestations
Siblings
AIDS
Interviews
Therapeutics
health care delivery system
Appointments and Schedules
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
telephone interview
interview
abstraction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

Oral health perceptions and adherence with dental treatment referrals among caregivers of children with HIV. / Broder, Hillary; Russell, Stefanie L.; Varagiannis, Evelyn; Reisine, Susan T.

In: AIDS Education and Prevention, Vol. 11, No. 6, 12.1999, p. 541-551.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Broder, Hillary ; Russell, Stefanie L. ; Varagiannis, Evelyn ; Reisine, Susan T. / Oral health perceptions and adherence with dental treatment referrals among caregivers of children with HIV. In: AIDS Education and Prevention. 1999 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 541-551.
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