Optimal Recall from Bounded Metaplastic Synapses

Predicting Functional Adaptations in Hippocampal Area CA3

Cristina Savin, Peter Dayan, Máté Lengyel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A venerable history of classical work on autoassociative memory has significantly shaped our understanding of several features of the hippocampus, and most prominently of its CA3 area, in relation to memory storage and retrieval. However, existing theories of hippocampal memory processing ignore a key biological constraint affecting memory storage in neural circuits: the bounded dynamical range of synapses. Recent treatments based on the notion of metaplasticity provide a powerful model for individual bounded synapses; however, their implications for the ability of the hippocampus to retrieve memories well and the dynamics of neurons associated with that retrieval are both unknown. Here, we develop a theoretical framework for memory storage and recall with bounded synapses. We formulate the recall of a previously stored pattern from a noisy recall cue and limited-capacity (and therefore lossy) synapses as a probabilistic inference problem, and derive neural dynamics that implement approximate inference algorithms to solve this problem efficiently. In particular, for binary synapses with metaplastic states, we demonstrate for the first time that memories can be efficiently read out with biologically plausible network dynamics that are completely constrained by the synaptic plasticity rule, and the statistics of the stored patterns and of the recall cue. Our theory organises into a coherent framework a wide range of existing data about the regulation of excitability, feedback inhibition, and network oscillations in area CA3, and makes novel and directly testable predictions that can guide future experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1003489
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Synapse
synapse
Synapses
Data storage equipment
Hippocampus
hippocampus
Cues
Retrieval
Probabilistic Inference
Excitability
Neuronal Plasticity
Aptitude
Network Dynamics
Plasticity
Range of data
Neurons
plasticity
oscillation
Neuron
statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Ecology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Optimal Recall from Bounded Metaplastic Synapses : Predicting Functional Adaptations in Hippocampal Area CA3. / Savin, Cristina; Dayan, Peter; Lengyel, Máté.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 10, No. 2, e1003489, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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