One Roof, Three Generations: Grandparental Co-residence and Child Outcomes in China

Wen-Jui Han, Timothy Whetung, Xupeng Mao

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This study examined the association between grandparental co-residence and child academic and behavioral outcomes using a sample from Shanghai, China (n = 1,763), and was built on two theoretical perspectives: intergenerational solidarity theory and the contextual model of family stress. These models integrate the impact of residential and relational proximity to grandparents on child well-being and underscore the importance of family context. This study also explored the moderating effects of family resources using proxies that prior theoretical and empirical studies have found to be important to such associations: family income, parental education, hukou status, and subjective social status. Results indicated that among families without co-residing grandparents, rural and low-income parents reported their children to have more externalizing behavioral issues than their respective urban and non-low-income counterparts. In addition, children who resided in poorly resourced families (i.e., low family income, low parental education, low subjective social status, or rural hukou status) tended to benefit from living with grandparents compared to their well-resourced counterparts in terms of lower externalizing and internalizing behaviors reported by teachers. These results do not negate the potential beneficial effects of living with grandparents for children in well-resourced environments. Implications for practice and policy, as well as future research directions, are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalFamily Process
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

    Fingerprint

    China
    family income
    social status
    low income
    child well-being
    Education
    solidarity
    education
    parents
    Proxy
    Child Welfare
    income
    Theoretical Models
    Parents
    teacher
    resources
    Grandparents

    Keywords

    • Academic performance
    • Behavioral outcomes
    • China
    • Grandparental co-residence
    • Grandparents
    • Living arrangement

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Psychology
    • Clinical Psychology
    • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

    One Roof, Three Generations : Grandparental Co-residence and Child Outcomes in China. / Han, Wen-Jui; Whetung, Timothy; Mao, Xupeng.

    In: Family Process, 01.01.2019.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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